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NZ Classic CarNZ Classic Car

NZ Classic Car No 337 January 2019

New Zealand’s longest running classic car magazine – celebrated its 300th edition in January 2016, an amazing achievement for a publication which began as a simple idea to put local classic car owners in touch with event organisers, car clubs and trade professionals. NZ Classic Car has been a vital part of the local motoring scene for more than 25 years and features unique and extensive classic motoring coverage. NZCC’s enthusiastic and passionate writers cover the length and breadth of the country ensuring extensive classic motoring coverage. Our coverage of New Zealand’s motoring heritage remains unrivalled, especially in the field of motorsport history, plus we include stunning photography, authoritative features and event reports from throughout the country.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Parkside Media
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
summer daze not summer craze

I am amazed how often as a passenger I hear drivers bemoaning, (a) the presence of road-policing cars, and (b) speed cameras. They’re referred to, in a way that reverts to the vernacular, as revenue gatherers at best. I’m not usually given to using the language often employed to describe either the officers or the systems being used. Remember, the road-policing officer probably loves his mum just like you do.At this time of the year, we at New Zealand Classic Car would like to wish you all happy and safe summer of motoring. The roads can be dangerous, so maybe there’s a few ways that we can all help to keep the wretched road toll from climbing ever higher.Presumably, those of us reading this magazine enjoy cars and driving them,…

access_time10 min.
better than standard, this was a triumph

Britain’s The Guardian newspaper chose 1963 as the year that defined the ‘modern era’ — an era when politics and culture collided. In the UK, in 1963, while all The Beatles wanted to do was hold your hand, Ronnie Biggs and friends robbed a train. In the US, things were on a different scale: Martin Luther King had a dream, and JFK was assassinated.As we look back from the beginning of 2019, all this was quite a long time ago. The train robbery, especially, was comically old-fashioned. The first police radio call about it stated, “A robbery has been committed and you’ll never believe it — they’ve stolen the train.” As things turned out, they’d stolen a little more than just the train.This really is the stuff of another era.…

access_time7 min.
roman holiday

You’d be hard-pressed to find a classic car enthusiast who doesn’t agree that two-seater Italian sports cars represent a high point of automotive expression, both of a national character and of beautiful cars. Ferrari is the standard-bearer for this art form, for a multitude of reasons: consider the Prancing Horse logo; say the onomatopoeic name — and think of a revving V12 — picture the bright red colour adopted by all of the Italy’s race cars; and don’t forget the millions of dollars that Ferrari 250 GTOs, or anything that looks like them, command.Part of what makes them so great is the mountain of other beautiful and brilliant cars that Ferrari had to climb to reach that pinnacle. The ’50s, ’60s, and early ’70s were the era of the great…

access_time9 min.
lunch with bob mcmurray

The second practice session for the US Grand Prix (GP) was just finishing as I arrived at the McMurrays’ large, comfortable home in semi-rural north-west Auckland. You’d think that, after spending so much of his life wrapped up in Formula 1 (F1), Bob might not be quite as keen as he once was, but he was able to give me a full summary of what had happened.Bob is a fan; listen to him on a Monday evening between 6pm and 7pm on Radio Sport as he fizzes about the latest drama in the Aussie V8s, waxes lyrical about the most recent round of MotoGP, interviews Hayden Paddon or a star of the future, or rants about the current state of F1 — you can’t do that for as long he’s…

access_time2 min.
readers’ writes

LettersSEND YOUR LETTERS TO: Mail: Readers’ Writes, New Zealand Classic Car, PO Box 46,020, Herne Bay, Auckland 1147 Email: editor@classiccar.co.nzLOCKING UP A CLASSIC OR TWOPIn your editorial comment entitled Classics of Tomorrow, part of it reads: “If you’re certain you know which model, go and buy it now and put it away for your grandchildren.” This is precisely what I have done. Seven years ago, I purchased a one-lady-owner 1992 Ford Festiva in immaculate condition. Now, I know this seems mundane and rather new, but in four years’ time, with the VCC [Vintage Car Club] sliding 30-years rule, the Ford will be eligible to enter their events. My 21-year-old granddaughter and I have twice brought it out of storage in that seven years and entered the Henry Ford Memorial Rally,…

access_time9 min.
a thin blue haze

The modern-day Audi AG and the familiar Auto Union four-ring badge represent a motoring and sporting heritage recognizable worldwide. It is a vast organization, encompassing some of the most innovative engineering establishments in the world, including Volkswagen, Audi, Porsche, MAN, SEAT, Lamborghini supercars, and Ducati motorcycles, among others. The four rings symbolize the joining together of Audi, Horch, Wanderer, and DKW.In the late 1950s to the 1970s, the distinctive two-stroke, German DKW/Auto Union cars sold reasonably well in New Zealand, and were a surprisingly regular sight and sound on our roads. They were quirky and different, making them unusually popular compared with the regular British makes. Beautifully built; well-engineered; and with distinctive styling features, often in two-tone colours, DKWs stood out in the traffic.Two fiercely loyal enthusiasts of the DKW/Auto…

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