EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Travel & Outdoor
Outdoor Life

Outdoor Life

Nr. 4 - 2020

Our readers' hands-on spirit is reflected in the magazine's comprehensive gear tests and personal adventure stories. Whether shopping for a new rifle, searching for the hottest fishing holes this weekend or thirsting for exciting adventure tales, Outdoor Life is the ultimate resource.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
Frequency:
Quarterly
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9 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
valley county, montana / 11:07 a.m.

letters@outdoorlife.com Mike Stock (left) serves as the rudder for our improvised toboggan as we careen down a hill in northeast Montana. We could barely hold on, sliding our way to retrieve Stock’s buck, the culmination of an “old-school” mule deer hunt (see the full story on p. 82). We hunted in blue jeans with vintage rifles, and rediscovered the beauty of minimalist deer hunting is its priority on the hunt, not the gear. But with a buck down and no meat-toting packs—and fresh snow cloaking the plains—we decided to deploy an equally old-school packing tool: a roll of sheet plastic. The mile-long drag with the heavy buck strapped to the slippery and directionless tarp took nearly as long as the hunt itself.…

3 min.
in our prime

When most of us think about our hunting heritage, we flash back to the folks who taught us how to hunt in the first place—the close friends or relatives who helped us learn the skills and customs required to be accepted among the tribe of hunters. For me, that was my dad, uncle, and grandpa, who are all dyed-in-the-wool Wisconsin deer hunters. As a kid, I wanted nothing more than to join their deer camp. I had to wait until I was 11, when, finally, I would get to leave our Thanksgiving dinner party early with the other Robinson hunters (p. 64) and spend the rest of the weekend at camp. Forget the second helping of pumpkin pie, Mom—the wilderness is calling. That three-hour drive north felt like a rite of…

1 min.
tribal management

Tribal conservation programs have some unique management challenges and solutions, and even provide opportunities for nontribal hunters and anglers. Here are three to check out. Jicarilla Apache Game & Fish, New Mexico This agency helped restore mule deer to the 850,000-acre Jicarilla Apache Reservation and has created some of the best trophy elk herds in the state. Fort Peck Fish and Game Department, Montana Although antelope and upland birds are abundant, the Fort Peck program is known for reintroducing bison to the reservation and restoring the population to a huntable herd. Shoshone and Arapaho Fish and Game Department, Wyoming Since the department implemented game codes in 1984, ungulate populations on the Wind River Indian Reservation have soared.…

3 min.
roughing it

TO THE UNINITIATED, bowfishing may seem like the latest gear-intensive fad. Its popularity has surged in recent years thanks to TV shows, social media, and the rise of its most popular target: carp. But at its core, bowfishing is a minimalist pursuit that’s been around for millennia You don’t need an expensive bow or a platform decked out with stadium-bright lights, or even a boat. You just need a recurve or compound with a reel, a barbed arrow, a little stealth—and to put your catch-and-release principles on the back burner. FINDING FISH After checking your local regs, you have a few options for finding fish. Beka Garris, a diehard bowfisher from Ohio, recommends referencing your state’s freshwater lists to quickly determine which bodies of water hold carp and other rough fish. “Call your…

4 min.
go-bag basics

KEEPING AN EMERGENCY CACHE and bugout bag at home is always a good idea, but what if disaster strikes while you’re out and about? Predicated on addressing the survival hierarchy of Security, Medical, Shelter, Water, Fire, Food, Light, and Communication, this expert-vetted gear gives you the means to get back to your safe space when disaster strikes—in a kit designed for fast and light movement. 1. BAG Instead of a military-style pack that screams “I have a gun,” opt for the low-profile Umlindi from Hill People Gear ($220; hillpeoplegear.com). Rated to carry up to 120 pounds, with modular accessories available to add volume and functionality, the 33-liter Umlindi weighs a reasonable 2 pounds 13 ounces. Although larger than needed for our loadout, thoughtfully placed compression straps allow it to be cinched tight…

1 min.
wise words

We polled a hundred experienced deer hunters to mine nuggets of knowledge from their decades in the deer woods. These are the lessons they’ve learned the hard way, so that you don’t have to. Find the full list at outdoorlife.com/deerwisdom. Bend at the waist when you’re shooting from a stand so you don’t break form. Not doing so accounts for a heck of a lot of misses. —Kevin Reese Slow down. Everyone is always in too big of a hurry. Don’t push it. Let things unfold and it will happen. —Ray Eye Just go! Some of the best hunts I have ever had were during not-so-perfect weather or wind or temperature. —Derek Stromain Invest in the best. Quality optics will make or break a hunt. —Kevin Steele Carefully play the wind in pre-rut and post-rut.…