Overland Journal Spring 2018

Each issue of Overland Journal features in-depth coverage of equipment and vehicles, as well as full-length trip stories that span the globe. Our strict standards for writing and photography, in addition to our striking layout, means that our subscribers receive an expedition and adventure travel magazine that is at once inspiring, informative, and attractive.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Overland International
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$11.69
$36.56
5 Issues

in this issue

2 min
the feed

LETʼS HEAR IT FOR THE GIRL Our experience was limited to base camping with a pop-up trailer [until] I stumbled across Expedition Portal and Overland Journal. I started making my [overlanding] pitch to my girlfriend, Michelle, but she was unimpressed. Then, I read your article on the Mojave Road [Winter 2015]. Since we live in SoCal this became a must do for me, but it got a much more emotional response from Michelle, “Okay, buddy, exactly where am I supposed to go to the bathroom? Because I can’t hold it for 3 days.” If asked said question, do NOT walk your significant other out to your rig and point out the cool yellow-handled shovel attached to the roof rack. We recently completed our first overlanding trip, 3 days and 2 nights on the…

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5 min
spring 2018

BRYON BASS For Bryon, overland travel is often vocational necessity rather than a purely adventurous pursuit. To accomplish field research for a PhD in archaeology, he frequently rode a gear-laden BMW R100GS/PD roundtrip from Scotland to Croatia. He then worked as a contract archaeologist, taught field survey and excavation, and collaborated with the Department of Pre-and Protohistory, University of Zürich, before starting a consulting company. Work has led him to the Middle East, South Pacific, Americas, Africa, and Europe. Bryon is a photographer, scuba instructor, pilot, wilderness EMT, and certified public safety off-pavement vehicle operations instructor. He also conducts specialized safety courses for workforce members deployed to adverse locations, is on a search and rescue team, and serves in a law enforcement diving unit. TOM SHEPPARD Tom’s overlanding experience spans over 50 years…

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4 min
the state of overlanding

During the past few decades I’ve been a studious observer of the automotive industry, specifically following the four-wheel drive sector and trends that move the needle. Back in the ’80s this was from an enthusiast’s perspective, reading various periodicals, the automotive section of the local newspaper, and spending a lot of time on the trail and at trade shows talking to manufacturers. It was a different era; the auto industry was struggling to satisfy stringent EPA,CAFE,and DOT mandates,as well as survive significant swings in the economy. As I made the transition to journalism, focusing on extended backcountry travel, I found myself talking with a lot of people in the field and had an epiphany.Those who I encountered that owned a four-wheel drive didn’t consider themselves “four wheelers”and didn’t particularly like those…

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1 min
crkt homefront

A long-standing issue with pocket or jack knives is that when tasked with legitimate field service, their inner workings become clogged with debris. Whether scaling a fish or whittling kindling, even the most judicious user will eventually find themselves at a workbench dismantling their knives for cleaning. Columbia River Knife & Tool (CRKT) has addressed this dilemma with the Homefront folding knife and its “Field Strip” technology. Designed by Ken Onion, a world-renowned artisan, the 3.5-inch, modified drop point blade is shaped from AUS 8 high-carbon stainless steel (Rockwell HRc 57-58). The handle is made from 6061 aluminum, features a tip-up pocket clip, and tank jimping on the backstrap. The combination provides a good feel in hand. The back of the blade has a bayonet lug-style flipper that allows for deployment…

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1 min
bolid’ster jean’ster

When preparing for a moto excursion, it can be difficult to pack clothing not specifically designed for riding. Lack of space is the culprit, and many riders are familiar with this challenge. To create a more versatile, dual-purpose pant, some motorcycle apparel designers employ tailored cuts, muted colors, and low-profile zippers to suitable fabrics. That is one solution. Bolid’ster surmounts this conundrum by weaving together a combination of denim, Lycra, and a proprietary ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene fiber called Armlith 2.0. The brand’s armored jeans are versatile and comfortable; they protect riders from high-speed abrasions and also let you dismount in style. I recently tested the French company’s indigo blue Jean’ster for 4 months in temperatures ranging from 39°F to 106°F during archaeological field surveys, camping trips, and in office mode. In the…

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1 min
danner mountain 600

While heritage collections are nothing new, the Mountain 600 hiking boots from Danner represent one of the best; they’ve kept the vintage look but added the latest and greatest materials and enhanced performance. Engineered to stand up to everything the Pacific Northwest could throw at them, these hiking boots use three levels of defense to protect your feet from the elements: fabric/material choice, construction, and a waterproof liner. The uppers are made from a high-tech suede that is naturally lightweight, waterproof, and abrasion resistant. Danner cut down on the number of seams to reduce the chance of water seeping through and to also reduce blister potential. A waterproof liner ensures your feet stay dry. While wearing the Mountain 600s every day for 3 weeks on a recent trip to Patagonia, my…

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