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PC Powerplay

PC Powerplay Issue 285

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PC PowerPlay is Australia's original and best-selling PC games magazine. Offering a mix of games and hardware coverage, the magazine gives a complete picture for the PC entertainment enthusiast. Inside is breaking news of new games, detailed previews of upcoming games, and advice to help readers make sense of the array of hardware and tech products that hit the market each month. PC Powerplay doesn’t just promote tech, it benchmarks and analyses it to help gamers make the most intelligent purchasing decision they can.

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Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Bimonthly
SUBSCRIBE
$35.22
6 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
in the far future...

There is also, apparently, an endless supply of Games Workshop video games... that’s it; that’s really all the future is. But, thankfully, for every dozen or so shitty mobile games or z-tier PC release, we happen to get a good one. And with a quality title like Vermintide on the menu already, the upcoming Darktide – previewed this issue – has me more than a little bit excited. In other news, that burgeoning Warframe addiction I spoke about last issue? Well, it didn’t last, and the game that took over from it, well, that’s fallen by the wayside too – but that’s only because I’ve gone as far into Subnautica: Below Zero’s story. I mean, I could just hang around building endless sea bases, but hey... Tarkov isn’t going to escape…

5 min.
news

RIOT MOCKS VALORANT HACKERS, SAYS IT WILL BAN ANYONE WHO ‘RIDES THE CHEAT BUS ON THE HIGHWAY TO HELL’ The salt is oh-so-real. Riot’s latest blogpost about Valorant reveals some of the lengths the developer is going to in order to combat cheaters. Even before the game was released, catching cheaters has been one of Riot’s major priorities – not unreasonably, given how widespread cheating can be in competitive shooters. Most remarkably, for the online First Strike tournament, Riot reviewed every single player account because “we needed to know who every player was [...] We had to make the precedents and rules almost as we went, deciding what exactly constitutes a disqualification, and how we’d handle those.” Matt ‘K30’ Paoletti is Riot’s senior anti-cheat analyst, and reckons “we hit a decent mark, and have…

4 min.
cold feet

Fallout: The Frontier was in production for seven long years. A mod for Fallout: New Vegas the size of a full AAA release, its feature set was impressive: three huge playable campaigns, new weapons, full voice acting, and driveable, heavily-armed vehicles. Given that it was built on the ancient New Vegas engine, The Frontier was an impressive technical achievement – but it had no other redeeming features. Its overall tone was uneven, thanks in part to the lead writers of the three campaigns communicating very little with each other. The primary NCR questline was a shameless rip-off of Call of Duty, and while the modder responsible was clearly a master of scripting code, scripting dialogue wasn’t exactly his forte. Every single aspect of The Frontier felt incongruous. Tone deaf. There are too many…

3 min.
rome is where the heart is

Retrogaming; the fervent and irrational pursuit of a nostalgic experience, especially when your modern operating system won’t play nice (or other, unknown, logistical complications occur). Somehow, games from 2006 are now included in my definition, so you’ll just have to feel old alongside me, even if you’re 25. Yes, I had that periodic, overwhelming urge to play (the ridiculously, but nonetheless accurately, named) CivCity: Rome. I found a copy on Steam, so I was lulled into the false sense that things might actually be OK. They weren’t. It was $3. But first, some backstory. CivCity: Rome’s reviews (at release) were, at best (and as my grandmother would have said in a disapproving tone), ‘middling’; 67 on Metacritic. Most mentioned the incongruous British accents, the fact that every shop looked alike, clumsy…

5 min.
hobbit forming

The Minecraft community continues to blow minds with its incredible builds, but even in that lofty company Minecraft Middle-earth stands out. This block-by-block recreation of JRR Tolkein’s world has to be seen to be believed. All of Middle-earth’s top hot-spots – and everything else – has been recreated in the blocky sandbox. You can take a quiet stroll through Hobbiton, delve into the depths of Moria, and so much more. Ever wanted to swan dive off the apex of Minas Tirith? I’ve done it – it’s awesome. Minecraft Middle-earth celebrated its ten-year anniversary last month, so I spoke with the server’s founder Nicky Vermeersch, also known as q220, about its humble beginnings and why anyone in their right mind would take on such an ambitious build. Vermeersch was first introduced to Minecraft when…

11 min.
a collection aside

2020 was a decent enough year for MEGHANN O’NEILL in many ways, at least in comparison to how many others experienced it. She did find that (after working remotely and sitting at the computer all day) she did not want to sit (in the same place) and play games during her precious little down time, for perhaps the first time ever. When not explicitly reviewing for PCPP, she took up knitting. Scary! Thankfully, a few weeks break has set her to rights, and she’s back to obsessively exploring the most lengthy, difficult and nostalgic titles to be found. We hope you’ll find something in this collection that will allow you to enjoy a well-deserved rest. LITTLEWOOD DEVELOPER Sean Young PRICE $21.50AVAILABILITY Released WEBSITE https://store.steampowered.com/app/894940/Littlewood/ 2020 was tough for everyone, in divergent ways. I’m…