Rachael Ray In Season Summer 2021

In Season is a magazine from everybody’s favorite TV foodie, Rachael Ray! Our Holiday 2021 issue is bursting with ideas to help you create an unforgettable holiday season. From sparkling sippers and easy dippers, a mix and match guide to planning your best menu for any holiday (Thanksgiving through New Year’s Eve), and favorite holiday comfort foods from chefs around the country, we’ll help you make entertaining effortless. Plus, great gifts for your loved ones, what your dog is really thinking and Rach’s 30 Minute leftovers bonanza. We’ve got your back as we all get back into the holiday groove.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Operations Corporation
Frequency:
Quarterly
$19.05
$29.33
4 Issues

in this issue

3 min
rach’s letter

welcome to the jungle Actually, we’re in our greenhouse. For years we dreamed about having one. Wouldn’t it be nice, we thought, to put up a little place near the house to start plants and grow things in the winter? Then the house burned down, so now we have a greenhouse up there, but no house! But we can get fresh herbs and tomatoes out of season; kale grows like a weed, eggplants too. Lush tomatoes in late winter? That’s luxury. My grandpa used to grow food for his family—he had to, with 10 kids, on working-class wages! And in time he had enough to feed the whole neighborhood. When I met John, he had a little tiny rooftop space where he grew tomatoes and herbs in pots and planters and I…

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4 min
adrian miller

“Food tells the story of a people,” says Adrian Miller, author, educator, and soul food scholar. “Any discussion of it puts you on that path to understanding the plight of a people. I’m very interested in that, in how food can bring us together and help us overcome our differences.” His day-to-day may be as executive director of the Colorado Council of Churches (he’s the first African American, as well as the first layperson, to hold that position). And he may have been an attorney and special assistant to Bill Clinton (“I worked on the President’s Initiative for One America, an outgrowth of his Initiative on Race,” he says). But Miller’s passion is educating the world about Black food through his research and writing. And that includes barbecue, whose roots…

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2 min
refugee chefs dish up mealtime adventures

Imagine building a business like Manal Kahi’s. In 2013, when she arrived in New York at the height of the Syrian refugee crisis, she noticed her new home was lacking good hummus (like the kind her grandmother, a native of Aleppo, would make). Seeking out partnership with International Rescue Committee, she established Eat Offbeat, a catering company staffed by global refugees—making the authentic foods of their homelands—and amassed a substantial client list that included banks, universities, and tech firms like Airbnb. “We served casual team meetings for 10 people and gala dinners for 1000,” she says. Now imagine a global pandemic trying to take all of that away. So Kahi and her team evolved, and now Eat Offbeat delivers boxes of fresh prepared food to adventurous diners around New York City.…

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4 min
spam cake!

Scrolling through Instagram one day, a beautiful flower-and-pineapple-topped vision stopped me in my tracks. The Musubirthday cake is a riff on Hawaii’s beloved Spam musubi—a slice of the canned ham atop rice and wrapped in seaweed that you can find in every grocery store, gas station, and 7-Eleven in the state. Yes, this magnificent gluten-free “cake” is made with…Spam. I commented: “This was the birthday cake I should have had!” The chef who’d posted it, Italian-born, Hawaii-based Rosalinda Mariotti (@growing_up_italian), offered to send me the recipe and a can of hard-to-find Spam Tocino, the Filipino flavor she prefers using in the cake. (Fun fact: Spam comes in 10 flavors!) I got “baking” and posted across my social channels; I’ve never had more requests for a recipe. And the cake isn’t just…

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2 min
6 things rach is loving right now

1. GOORIN HATS I’m a hat girl, and every year at the South By Southwest festival in Austin, I’d swing by the Goorin shop and build on my collection of really cool hats. It’s a ritual for me! And I kept them all in our house, of course, so when it burned down, I started over again. Not the worst thing! goorin.com 2. BURLAP & BARREL CURRY BLENDS I was so sad when my friend Indian chef Floyd Cardoz passed away last spring. His wife is carrying on his legacy with these beautiful fair-trade spices. Use the Goan masala as a shortcut in my Bombay Grilled Cheese on page 65. burlapandbarrel.com 3. I WANT TO THANK YOU BY GINA HAMADEY I spend a few hours a week responding to letters of support I’ve received from…

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2 min
sing a new tune

If you like Alabama Shakes, you’ll love Valerie June Valerie June is all over the place, genre-wise. The Moon and Stars: Prescriptions for Dreamers features country pedal steel and West African–style guitar, but it’s closest to the blues’ original mission statement: songs that can’t be sung without a full heart and a troubled spirit. Her crackle-glass voice captivates, whether she’s whispering over quiet guitar or burning through the R&B ballad “Call Me a Fool.” If you like Phoebe Bridgers, you’ll love Julien Baker You can cue up Julien Baker when you’re in the mood for a good cry—or not. Her Little Oblivions is shimmery enough to pep you up in a six-cart grocery line. But when you do need to let it out, she’s your girl. Her plaintive voice gives life to lyrics…

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