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Radio Times

Radio Times 6-12th July 2019

Get the same great content you know and love, from the UK’s biggest selling quality magazine. Every week: -> News and Views from broadcasting’s biggest names, best writers and brightest stars. -> Find unmissable entertainment with our roundup of the Best of the Week -> Stunning photo-shoots, red carpet reportage and exclusive behind-the-scenes pics. -> Guides to the best TV, film and radio each day. -> Film review from the Radio Times’ Film team, including Barry Norman and Andrew Collins. -> The best of iPlayer, Netflix and other catch-up and on-demand services. -> Comprehensive listings so you’ll never miss a show, and with handy links so you can jump to your desired day of the week. -> Puzzles, including crosswords, Egg Heads and Only Connect.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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51 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
welcome to a very special issue…

IN A YEAR that’s full of notable anniversaries, this month’s 50th anniversary of the first Moon landing feels extra special. As you’ll see on the panel on page 12, there are a huge number of programmes marking the occasion on TV and radio this week and next. There are documentaries, a drama-documentary, radio shows, even a Prom (read more about how the Proms are celebrating this historical moment in next week’s Radio Times). But also, we as a magazine are for ever linked with the event because of the issue we brought out in early July 1969. When people discover I’m the editor of RadioTimes, more mention this issue than any other. The incredible cover, the background information, the pull-out posters for the younger members of the family. This week we’re…

1 min.
this week 6—12 july 2019

WHAT I’M WATCHING… JAMES BURKE ‘I’m a news freak,” says the veteran broadcaster and writer, “so I have to have the daily fix of Radio 4’s Today every morning and PM in the late afternoon. You can still hear people thinking on radio. The only equivalent for me on TV is the BBC News channel programme Beyond 100 Days.’ Reach for the Moon — p8 GORDON KENNEDY ‘Killing Eve is magnificent,” says the comedy writer and performer, “but please don’t make eight series and end up with Mr Eve crowned king while Carolyn Martens melts the throne. I’m also watching season four of Gomorrah on Sky Atlantic – a sensational Neapolitan Mafia series, which is dark, dirty and d’Italian. Actor Salvatore Esposito is an icon for all of us aspiring chunky male leads.’ Three cheers for…

3 min.
‘i like the pictures as they are’

IT’S THE GREATEST discovery in the history of archaeology. On 26 November 1922 in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, Howard Carter peered into the tomb of Tutankhamun and saw a host of strange, beautiful objects that had been hidden for nearly 3,500 years. He was struck dumb. Behind him was Lord Carnarvon, who’d rushed from his home at Highclere Castle, better known to you and me as Downton Abbey. “Can you see anything?” he enquired anxiously. Carter could only reply: “Yes, wonderful things.” I have been working on a Channel 5 series – to be broadcast later this year – that provides fresh insights into the life and legend of Tutankhamun. We have used all sorts of techniques to make the story come alive. Those people who know me…

1 min.
from the rt archive… 5—11 july 1997

WHAT WE WATCHED It is a truth universally acknowledged that Andrew Davies’s 1995 dramatisation of Pride and Prejudice was one of the best pieces of TV drama ever made. And two years after it first wowed BBC1 audiences, its repeat showing still merited a coveted place on the cover of RT. The adaptation was of course noted for its strong overtones of sex, culminating in Colin Firth’s famous Darcy plunge in the Pemberley pond in the fourth episode while Elizabeth is visiting his home. “I am notorious for this but I think it’s one of the nice things in life to write about,” Davies told us. WHAT YOU SAID Readers seemed to be quite alarmed about perceived implausibilities in The Archers’ recent crime wave. Clive Horrobin, Ambridge’s serial villain, had just been released from…

5 min.
reaching for the moon

‘One small step happened for a UK audience of 22 million at 3.56am’JAMES BURKE Eight Days: to the Moon and Back Wednesday 9.00pm BBC2 THE EVENING OF 20 July 1969 saw Cliff Michelmore (anchor), Patrick Moore (astronomer) and me (geek) sitting in the amazing BBC Space Studio, ready to broadcast the greatest adventure in history: Apollo 11. For those of you under 50, that’s a perfectly straightforward description of a TV set-up. But think again. We weren’t doing it in the world you now live in. This was the past. In 1969, Britain had towns full of soot-blackened buildings, and half the population had no TV or cars – or inside loos. Above all, we lived with an “Iron Curtain” dividing Europe into East and West, opposing sides in the Cold War between…

7 min.
‘i was there’

The Day We Walked on the Moon Coming soon to ITV ‘I had 15 seconds to make a call – should I abort the mission?’STEVE BALES ADAM RAPHAEL was a 31-year-old Washington correspondent for The Guardian when he was sent to cover Apollo 11’s eight-day mission EVEN FROM TWO-AND-A-HALF miles away you could feel the ground shaking like an earthquake when Apollo launched with this gargantuan roar. It was the most fantastic spectacle. Fantastic, and treacherous: all of us gathered there on Cocoa Beach in Florida to watch it knew that some of the biggest dangers were in those first few moments after lift-off. Apollo 11 was carrying hundreds of thousands of gallons of liquid rocket fuel – just one gyroscopic failure and it could explode on the launchpad or after take-off. The biggest…