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Radio Times

Radio Times 24-30th October 2020

Get the same great content you know and love, from the UK’s biggest selling quality magazine. Every week: -> News and Views from broadcasting’s biggest names, best writers and brightest stars. -> Find unmissable entertainment with our roundup of the Best of the Week -> Stunning photo-shoots, red carpet reportage and exclusive behind-the-scenes pics. -> Guides to the best TV, film and radio each day. -> Film reviews from the film team including writer Andrew Collins. -> The best of iPlayer, Netflix and other catch-up and on-demand services. -> Comprehensive listings so you’ll never miss a show, and with handy links so you can jump to your desired day of the week. -> Puzzles, including crosswords, Egg Heads and Only Connect.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
Frequency:
Weekly
SUBSCRIBE
$151.86
51 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
let’s dance!

THERE may be trouble ahead, but while there’s moonlight and music and love and romance, let’s face the music and dance… Was there ever a better moment to quote Irving Berlin? Or even a better moment for the nation to reach for its dancing shoes? Goodness knows we need the distraction. So, thank you to the BBC for moving heaven and earth to bring us the 2020 version of Strictly Come Dancing. We need a reason to smile more than ever. But how do you hold a dancing contest in the middle of a pandemic? After all, it’s not easy to socially distance your way through a tango. Frankly, even if it was, it wouldn’t make for great television. But the BBC has found a way to stage the impossible. Read how…

1 min.
this week 24—30 october 2020

WHAT I’M WATCHING… CLARA AMFO ‘I’m obsessed with Ratched on Netflix,” says the Radio 1 presenter and Strictly contestant. “I love Ryan Murphy’s dramas – the high camp, the drama, his obsession with the 40s and 60s era in America. And I also watched a film called Rocks, which is about four young girls living in London. It’s absolutely brilliant. You’ll be on the floor crying by the end of it.’ Clara and Aljaz — page 15 BILL BAILEY ‘I’ve been persevering with a German dystopian time-travelling drama called Dark on Netflix,” says the comedian and Strictly contestant. “It’s dark and quite hard to follow – it’s set in the present day, and then it’s set in the 80s, and then it’s set in the 50s, and then it’s set in the 20s. I’ve watched…

3 min.
we need music more than ever

EARLIER THIS MONTH we had a Long Weekend showcasing our BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists with live broadcasts from Wigmore Hall in London. A moving moment came when young pianist Eric Lu, his voice full of emotion, having just given a sublime performance of a Schubert sonata, told the audience that he’d not played in public since March. This shows the terrible paradox we face. As we need music more than ever, those who make their living making that music for us are having a hard and uncertain time. This is true if you’re a freelance musician or running a venue. The world ahead still seems uncertain. But all of us involved must think of the future and sustain musicians and composers however we can. At Radio 3 we’re trying to…

1 min.
from the rt archive… 24—30 october 1998

WHAT WE WATCHED Tony Garnett’s provocative drama The Cops had begun on BBC2 the previous week and attracted attention, thanks to its raw-edged documentary style, brutal violence and scenes of police officers taking drugs. “They are human beings, just like us, and they’re under particular pressures,” said Garnett. “But they also have power over other human beings that most of us don’t have. There are very few shows that go out into life in Britain as it’s really lived by so many people.” The Cops would go on to win back-to-back Bafta awards in the best drama series category in 1999 and 2000 and was nominated for a third time in 2001. WHAT YOU SAID Casualty was accused of treating one particular hospital job with disdain. “Give the gas-passers a break,” wrote Dr…

13 min.
strictly a miracle!

Strictly Come Dancing Saturday 7.25pm BBC1 THE CLARION CALL in every episode of Strictly is to “keeeep dancing”, but getting those feet moving during a pandemic has been a momentous task. “This is probably the toughest show to get going in the current Covid climate,” admits Kate Phillips, acting controller of BBC1. So how have they managed to achieve it? Skimping on spectacle clearly wasn’t an option, so the professional dancers isolated together in a hotel in order for all 14 group performances to be prerecorded – something Oti Mabuse says is “actually a positive, as we don’t have to do them each Saturday!” Some of the orchestration will also be recorded. But musical director Dave Arch will be present on the night, as will his singers and some key musicians. Missing, however,…

13 min.
‘yes, of course i want it!’

The Sister Monday—Thursday 9.00pm ITV There are three of us in this interview: Russell Tovey, me and the French bulldog. Rocky may be off stage – on the Zoom screen of the actor’s Shoreditch loft – but he wants his master’s attention and he’s not holding back. Our wide-ranging conversation covering everything from the history of art to life after death is punctuated by regular interventions of loud barking and Tovey’s gentle but firm reprimands: “Shut up, Rocky, I’m talking to the Radio Times.” He may be pushing 40 but Tovey still looks ridiculously young with his freckles and cheeky chappy vibe (he would have made a great Artful Dodger when he was a child actor). His hair is shaved with grey stubble at the sides, and a darker clump on the…