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Total Film

Total Film July 2019

Total Film is the world’s best movie magazine, a monthly digest of what's hot in the empire of movie culture. Each issue offers in-depth features on the biggest movies - both mainstream and arthouse. You'll find the latest movie news, reviews of all the new releases, star interviews, on-set reports and an extensive home entertainment guide that rates all the new releases in dvd, blu-ray, videogames, books and soundtracks. If you love movies, then Total Film Magazine is your unmissable monthly companion.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
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13 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
welcome to total film

Start your engines, readers – it’s Fast & Furious time again. We hung out with hardmen Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham to try to get a sense of just how nuts their new spin-off, Hobbs & Shaw, is going to be. ’Cos I don’t know about you, but we want bigger, more bonkers and more bombastic than ever. And obviously, no candy asses need apply. Talking about big, we say happy 20th birthday to two blockbusters this issue, The Matrix and American Pie; have a deep dive chinwag with Patricia Arquette; talk through the beefy back catalogue of legendary director, William Friedkin; and get Fleabag’s thoughts on re-tooling the new Bond film. As usual, we also review every new release to give you the most reliable and comprehensive view of…

1 min.
total film wingman

DEAR WINGMAN I make no secret of the fact that I really don’t like the Fast & Furious series. Why, then, do I find myself looking forward to Hobbs & Shaw? I streamed the trailer and laughed out loud before I could stop myself. My wife immediately checked my temperature. Saw it again at the cinema and stage-whispered to my friend, “I want to see that.” He took me straight to A&E. There doesn’t seem to be anything wrong with me. I still hate the series but can’t seem to shake this excitement for another Rock classic. Hope you can help and that it’s not a (Dwayne) Johnson infection. THOMAS ELLIS, VIA EMAIL WINGMAN SAYS… On the other hand, sounds like you might have a Diesel allergy… Take a couple of Riddicks (xXx strength)…

5 min.
dialogue

EMAIL totalfilm@futurenet.com WRITE Total Film, 1-10 Praed Mews, London W2 1QY (postal addresses will be used for the sole purpose of sending out prizes) gamesradar.com/totalfilm twitter.com/totalfilm facebook.com/totalfilm Drop us a line totalfilm@futurenet.com STAR LETTER ★ I’ve just finished watching Pokémon: Detective Pikachu and was instantly drawn back to the world of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, where ‘toons lived side by side with human folk. I couldn’t help but think this film may have been influenced by the 1988 noir classic. I mean, the lead is no Bob Hoskins, but maybe Roger is a Pokémon of old? I wonder what other live-action/animation crossovers are to come once they realise how successful the formula is. Do you have any thoughts about future crossovers? SHAUN MCCABE, VIA EMAIL Roger as an OG Pokémon? Our minds are blown…

5 min.
best of the fest

Once the first and last word in film festivals, Cannes has lost ground in recent years to Venice and TIFF – both better placed to launch major awards-season fare in the autumn – while continued friction with Netflix has cost Cannes some big hitters. But this year’s festival de cinéma proved Cannes is in no danger of losing its crown, as the Croisette played host to a sublime selection of features from around the world. THE LIGHTHOUSE Robert Eggers’ follow-up to The Witch didn’t play in competition but was, by a stretch, the best film at this year’s Cannes. An oppressively nightmarish two-hander starring Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe as a pair of lighthouse keepers who lose the plot after a devastating storm strands them on their temporary island home, it does…

2 min.
leonardo dicaprio

Most actors follow up an Oscar win with a slew of big projects, eager to make hay while the sun shines. Leonardo DiCaprio, meanwhile, has not appeared on screen since he finally nabbed his golden baldie at the fifth attempt by fighting a bear and freezing his pecs off in 2015’s The Revenant. Why the absence? Perhaps it’s taken four years to get over feasting on raw bison liver – Leo was still shuddering many months later, when he recalled, “The bad part is the membrane around it, like a balloon. When you bite into it, it bursts in your mouth.” More likely he just fancied a break, having been acting since the age of five, and, in his early twenties, becoming one of the most famous people on the planet…

2 min.
young blood

Though little-known in the UK, Alvin Schwartz’s beloved children’s books, Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark, traumatised a generation of Americans with their unsettling tales and Stephen Gammell’s blood-curdling illustrations. The feature adaptation, which Guillermo del Toro co-wrote and was due to direct before passing the torch to Trollhunter’s André Øvredal, may be a PG-13 (expect a 15 in the UK), but it won’t go soft on unsuspecting audiences. “PG-13 doesn’t have any limits to how scary you can get,” Øvredal points out. “It’s usually just a bunch of technicalities. There is a limit of blood. There is a limit of violence. There is a limit of bad language. But beyond that, you can make the scariest movie you want.” Schwartz’s three volumes contain 82 short tales drawn from folklore and…