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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Wilderness

Wilderness February 2021

Each issue of Wilderness takes its readers to the most beautiful areas in New Zealand, whether by foot, mountain bike, sea kayak, raft, pony or dream.

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Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lifestyle Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
$6.95
$55
12 Issues

in this issue

2 min
the year of seeing more

WE ALL WAIT with bated breath to see what the coming year has in store. Can we reopen our borders, relax quarantine measures and will the rest of the world be able to use vaccinations to bring Covid-19 under control? The general feeling among my friends and colleagues is that 2021 will be much like 2020, except without the lockdowns. Overseas travel will be limited, but we’ll have unrestricted opportunity to travel New Zealand and explore the regions and wilderness areas in relative peace – a bit like some of our recent Last Weekend photo submitters have been able to do (see Paul Halkett’s image of a deserted Tongariro Alpine Crossing on p9). 2021 will be a real chance to see more of New Zealand. That’s an exciting prospect, but I am mindful…

3 min
pigeon post

POOR RUNNING ILLUSTRATION It was good to see some advertising for trail running shoes (‘2021 Trail running shoes’, January 2021) as New Zealand is such a great place for trail running. It was a bit disappointing, however, that the accompanying photo was not that of a trail runner, nor even a runner wearing trail shoes. In fact, I would even go so far as to suggest that no self-respecting trail-runner would head to the hills dressed in the gear the model was wearing. New Zealand’s terrain, being as it is, would also mean many of us would not only dress appropriately but also carry water, a hat and maybe a phone or whistle just in case. There was no sign of any of that in the picture chosen for the gear guide. -…

1 min
wild cuisine meals inspire hut-envy

Having recently completed an extremely enjoyable tramp along the Milford Track with a group of nine work colleagues and their partners, I felt it would be rude not to share much of the credit for the trip’s success with Wilderness. It all started with Maddy Bellcroft’s great ‘Veggie fried noodles’ (Wild Cuisine, December 2020) on the first night. We sexed it up a bit with seven different vegetables and a kilogram of stir fried porterhouse steak (once the vegetarians had taken their share) and it went down a treat and may have initiated hut envy. Between courses that night, I split our group into pairs and gave them the Great Walks Quiz (from the Wilderness Daily email of October 22). The ultimate hut ice-breaker! Within minutes, almost all the 40 inhabitants of…

1 min
your trips, your pix

Get your photo published here to receive a $30 Silva Pocket Thermo Compass for accurate wayfinding and temperature-sussing. Learn more about Silva at e.ampro.co.nz. Last Weekend submission criteria can be found at wildernessmag.co.nz…

1 min
help wanted to find missing plane

FILMMAKER BOBBIE REEVE was in his early 20s when Dragonfly ZK-AFB disappeared on a scenic flight between Christchurch and Milford Sound. Likely downed somewhere in the Southern Alps, its pilot Brian Chadwick and his four passengers were never seen again. For nearly 60 years, the disappearance has endured as one of New Zealand’s greatest aviation mysteries. The incident mystified Reeve at the time, but took on extra meaning when he discovered he had met Chadwick several times – the pilot had bought a yacht from him two years prior. When Richard J. Waugh’s book Lost Without Trace: Brian Chadwick & the Missing Dragonfly was released in 2003, it changed Reeve’s life forever. “Buying it was probably the worst thing I ever did in my life. I read it three times, and I got hooked,” Reeve…

1 min
popular hot springs upgraded

THE MANGATAINOKA Hot Springs of Kaweka Forest Park have received a modern makeover. The popular natural hot springs, reached via the Te Puia Hut track, were closed for renovations in late 2020, but have reopened in time for summer soaks. The previous facilities were nearing the end of their life and needed an upgrade, DOC Hawke’s Bay senior ranger Malcolm Lock said. “The key changes are that it’s been moved slightly, has more capacity, better seating, and a better deck,” he said. “There are now three tubs instead of two, and the water can be turned on and off individually in the tubs. “Most importantly for visitors – it has a better view down to the river,” Lock said.…