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Wilderness August 2021

Each issue of Wilderness takes its readers to the most beautiful areas in New Zealand, whether by foot, mountain bike, sea kayak, raft, pony or dream.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lifestyle Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
$6.95
$55
12 Issues

in this issue

2 min
modern tracks are more accessible and that’s a good thing

TRACK BUILDING has come a long way since I was a child, mostly, I think, for the better. I didn’t always think that way. I remember walking the track to Cathedral Cove when it seemed no one else knew about the amazing Coromandel beach. It was a horrible, exhausting track. But the reward of a deserted beach, with a waterfall to shower beneath made it an exciting adventure. By contrast, when I first walked the modern concrete path the trail has since become, the trip no longer sparked joy; the sense of adventure was lost (sharing the trail with hundreds of others didn’t help, either). Until a few years ago, I used to mourn that loss of adventure but the truth is the old track could not handle the volume of traffic…

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3 min
pigeon post

BOOTS NOT WHAT THEY USED TO BE Back in the 60s, when my life revolved around tramping, we would buy a pair of ‘John Bull’ boots, or similar, and they would last for years and years. The soles were heavy-duty, sewn and screwed onto the boots. Then we’d whack some ‘tricounis’ into the insteps so we didn’t slip on greasy tree roots. Admittedly, the boots were exceedingly heavy but, boy, they could sure take the punishment! Every time I read anything about boot maintenance in Wilderness, it is suggested that a leather wax or conditioner is rubbed into the leather so that the boots will last. I contend that this is a complete waste of time with modern boots as the soles will inevitably come adrift way before the leather packs up.…

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1 min
letter of the month

TRAMPING WITH A TODDLER After reading the amazing achievement of the Gerlach family ‘Holding on to trail life’ (July 2021), I felt motivated to share our recent experience of completing our first overnight hike with two children aged seven months and 30 months. I’ve read tips on how to successfully tramp with babies and school-age children; but is there a 101 on the art of an overnight hike with a toddler? Here is what we learnt: •Compartmentalise your daily toddler snacks into snack pouches for each day. Having a snack pouch handy in my pack’s waist pocket made for a quickly accessible distraction when tramping to Te Rereatukahia Hut. •Sometimes a cracker with cheese doesn’t quite cut the mustard. That’s when bribery with a once-daily ‘sweet treat’ gets you over that steep climb. •When our tummies…

1 min
your trips, your pix

Get your photo published here to receive a Victorinox Escort keyring pocket knife worth $22. Learn more about Victorinox at e.ampro.co.nz. Last Weekend submission criteria can be found at wildernessmag.co.nz…

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1 min
fundraiser for new middlemarch hut

A TRAMPING CLUB is hoping to raise $170,000 to replace an historic hut 1220m up the Rock and Pillar Range above Middlemarch. Otago Tramping and Mountaineering Club member John Cocks said the hut will replace the old Leaning Lodge Hut, which was built by the Otago Ski Club in 1958. The tramping club bought the hut in the 1970s after the ski club moved to Coronet Peak, but the hut was closed in the 1990s after the land became part of the DOC estate and it was deemed unsafe. The club upgraded the hut in 2014, but it was still deemed non-compliant and has been closed since. Now, after seven years, the club has decided to rebuild the hut, while salvaging materials from the old hut to retain its character where possible. The…

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1 min
new track maps make outdoors more ‘accessibel’

AN ONLINE TOOL designed to make the outdoors more accessible to the disabled by providing detailed track information is expanding around the country. Nearly a quarter of the population identify as disabled in some way, which can make experiencing the outdoors a challenge. The Accessibel website (accessibel.co.nz) aims to reduce those barriers by including detailed information about tracks and public spaces – like the location of stairs, track condition and gradient – so people with disabilities can choose tracks that suit their needs. The project is a partnership between DOC, the Halberg Foundation, software developer Sensibel and local councils and was launched last year. So far 34 tracks have been mapped. That is soon set to triple as 60 tracks are being mapped by out-of-work tourism employees in South Westland funded by a…

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