EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Crafts
WOOD Magazine

WOOD Magazine

July 2020

Every issue includes clear, fully illustrated plans for all types of projects from gifts to furniture, skill-building tips and techniques, and hard-hitting tool reviews. Get WOOD Magazine digital subscription today for helpful videos that bring the pages to life for woodworkers of all skill levels.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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7 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
going the distance

As I write this, the world struggles with the worst health crisis in more than 100 years. Schools shut down; graduations, weddings, and funerals banned; entire sports seasons at all levels suspended or ended; churches, restaurants, and government offices made off-limits; factories shuttered. All to prevent the spread of a virus through “social distancing,” a term that didn’t even exist two months ago but became a way of life literally overnight. In the midst of this pandemic (some folks argue you could leave “dem” out of that word), I realize how much I take for granted every day. Unlike health-care professionals and first responders, I can avoid contact with total strangers about whose health history I know nothing. Unlike those who staff gas stations, grocery stores, and restaurants, I can do…

1 min.
woodmagazine.com

THE LUMBER LOWDOWN It’s simple: Woodworking only works with wood. But it’s not so simple: Wood is complicated by board feet, a variety of grades, milling operations …the list goes on. We’ll prep you with the knowledge to get the most board for your bread. BUYING AT THE LUMBERYARD The fewer middlemen between you and the log, the more you’ll save. We’ll show you how. woodmagazine.com/lumberyard BUYING AT THE HOME CENTER Convenience comes at a price. But shop selectively and you’ll score great lumber at the home center. woodmagazine.com/homecenterlumber LEARN WHAT TO LOOK FOR Educate yourself on hardwood grades. woodmagazine.com/gradeschool Learn how to buy good plywood. woodmagazine.com/buygoodplywood Find the grain that makes your project pop. woodmagazine.com/grainreigns WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Make the most of your materials. woodmagazine.com/optimize “Knots” need not be a naughty word. woodmagazine.com/naughtyknotty FREE PLANS: STORE IT RIGHT Free plan: Budget-friendly lumber rack. woodmagazine.com/lumberrack Free plan: Mobile sheet-goods rack. woodmagazine.com/rollingsheetsrack…

9 min.
sounding board

After refurbishing a rusty old lathe for a neighbor, he and I tested it out by turning a pen from a kit. My 8-year-old son, Danny, was in the shop when we did and was just fascinated by the process. So much that the next day he asked if we could make another and if he could help. We went back out to the shop and made another pen, with Danny doing some of the sanding. Over the past weeks, Danny has asked to do more and more of the work, and is extremely safety-conscious. We work the tool together on the things he lacks confidence in, so he can get a feel for how it’s supposed to work. Danny has sold several pens already and is donating the money from his…

3 min.
your questions

Q What makes rare-earth magnets so rare? I can’t open a woodworking magazine, catalog, or website without seeing rare-earth magnets used in everything from tool organizers to shop jigs to jewelry boxes. They seem to be everywhere, and not too expensive, so where does the term “rare” come from? —Andrew Rhinehart, Dearborn, Mich. A The magnets you refer to, Andrew, get that name because they contain neodymium or samarium, two of 17 rare-earth elements. Despite that designation, some of those elements can actually be as abundant in the earth’s crust as lead or tin. The word “rare” applies to them because they don’t appear in concentrations or seams, as do elements such as copper or silver. Instead, rare-earth elements occur widely dispersed in ores; low concentrations often make mining them economically unviable. The rare-earth magnets you…

4 min.
work faster, smarter, safer

For Flat Panels, Strut’s Your Stuff I used to struggle gluing up flat panels. Now I use common strut channel (often referred to as Unistrut, a major brand), to hold boards in the panel perfectly flat as I clamp them. Home centers sell the U-shaped steel channels in 10' lengths costing about $20 each. Cut those into pieces a few inches longer than your widest glue-ups, arrange the channels and hardware as shown, then tighten the wingnuts just enough to flatten the glue-up. Add clamps and bring the glued edges together until you see squeeze-out. Feel the edges of the boards, and if they shift slightly out of flush alignment, tap them with a mallet. Tighten the wingnuts a bit more if necessary. With woods high in tannins, such as oak and…

4 min.
tabletop shuffleboard

Visit woodmagazine.com/miteredcorners to watch a video on how to cut perfect-fitting mitered panel corners. Pit your puck-placement skills against other players in this pint-size version of the popular bar game. Though the playing surface measures just 4' long, it’s made of laminated solid maple, just like the big boys. Ball-bearing pucks glide smoothly without the lubrication of messy powder, and four easy-adjust feet ensure a dead-level playing surface. First, Get on the Board 1 Glue up 1½"-wide maple strips to make a slightly oversize blank for the board (A) [Materials List, Exploded View]. (We glued strips of ¾" stock face-to-face.) Joint and plane the blank to finished thickness, then trim to width and length. 2 At the tablesaw cut three dadoes at both ends of the board [Drawing 1, Photo A]. Crosscut score-zone strips…