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OUTOUT

OUT August 2016

3 issues FREE with your subscription (extra issues already included in the subscription) Sexy, smart, and sophisticated, it inspires readers with captivating feature stories, striking fashion layouts, and lively entertainment reviews. Get OUT digital magazine subscription today to discover what's in. Each issue is filled with interviews, fashion, travel, celebrities and more for gay life today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Here Media
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10 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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contributors

TIM WALKER Provenance: London In this issue: Photographer, “Natural Born Offenders,” page 74 Bio: Walker photographed our cover with Absolutely Fabulous stars Jennifer Saunders and Joanna Lumley. A former assistant to Richard Avedon, he shot his first story for Vogue at 25. In 2008, he had his first exhibition at London’s Design Museum. Other outlets: Vogue (U.S., U.K., Italy), W, Love RICHARD HOUSE Provenance: Nottingham, U.K. In this issue: Writer, our summer fiction piece, “Honeybear” page 70 Behind the story: I lost one of the notebooks for this project [my upcoming book, Murmur] while in Iceland. It contained months of ideas that couldn’t be reconstructed. It was found on a train and returned to me months later by Gray Line. Other outlets: Prospect magazine, BBC Radio 4 Twitter: @FatboyReview BRUCE BENDERSON Provenance: Syracuse, N.Y. In this issue: Writer, “Reading Desire,” page 48 Behind the…

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feedback

LOVE HIM OR HATE HIM When Out’ June/July cover boy was revealed to be Nick Jonas, lines were immediately drawn. “Do any gay people actually see Nick Jonas as a gay icon?” asked Woodrow Whyte on Pop-Buzz.com, a reasonable question to ask of a 23-year-old pop star with a pretty face. But… media. We do love hyperbole. On the more serious allegation of Jonas’s gay-baiting, a theme explored in the story by Out editor at large Chadwick Moore, we dug what Sara Gilbert on The Talk had to say. Pushed on the quetstion by cohost Julie Chen, Gilbert gave Jonas a get-out-of-jail-free card. He was, she said, guilty only of “being hot.” For or against him, it’s obvious that the youngest Jonas brother’s signature smolder has branded the pop culture landscape, and it…

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boycotting home

A culture of antagonism and violence is filling the vacuum left by our failure to find consensus and common cause with one another. I HAVE ALWAYS HAD reservations about boycotts, perhaps because they’ve so often been wielded as a weapon against the oppressed. And then on June 24 I found myself in the strange position of boycotting my own country. It was the morning after the U.K. voted in a referendum to leave the European Union, a decision of such seismic consequences that it threw the country into agonizing turmoil while bringing the bigots quickly to the surface. It was like one of those dystopian novels I’d read as a teenager—Lord of the Flies, say—in which dramatically altered circumstances bring out the very worst in people. As Tom Sutcliffe, who hosts…

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piano man

“We did as best we could and then tumbled down the mountain together, shitting all over the music.” SIMON HELBERG’ personal connection to his new film Florence Foster Jenkins begins with New Kids on the Block. “They were my first concert,” says the actor, best known as over-styled super-geek Howard Wolowitz from the hit CBS series The Big Bang Theory. “I knew all their dances. I grew a rattail, and my mom braided it. I thought, I’ll be a singer. All I have to do is stand there, and sing, and I’ll be famous.” But like Jenkins—a real-life 1940s New York socialite played by an intentionally off-key Meryl Streep—Helberg lacked the skills to back his dream. “I recorded myself and played it for my parents,” says the Los Angeles native, sitting in…

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the gay agenda

1. The Get Down BAZ LUHRMANN’S FUNKY NETFLIX LEAP OF FAITH In the pilot for The Get Down, this summer’s Netflix show about the 1970s New York music boom, a character leaps from one rooftop to another, a stolen record in his hand and brick and mortar crumbling beneath his feet. The moment speaks to the artistic leap taken by co-creator Baz Luhrmann, who, with this series, applies his musical-maestro skills to the small screen—and the black experience—for the first time. Teaming with TV bigwig Shawn Ryan (The Shield), the director delivers an urban iteration of Dazed and Confused, but this time the hip-huggers are struck with neon sheen and joined by mirrorball reflections. Featuring rising stars Justice Smith (Paper Towns), Shameik Moore (Dope), and Jaden Smith, The Get Down taps into…

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southeast portland

THE OBSESSION WITH small-batch living didn’t begin in Brooklyn, as some might have you believe. Oregon’s Portland deserves all the credit, starting with its craft-beer movement in the 1980s. Since then, PDX—locals refer to the city by its airport code—has always been three steps ahead, championing handmade commercialism in all facets of life, from food to home goods. The most enthusiastic flag-bearer of that spirit: its southeast quadrant. With cheaper real estate, a new public transportation link to the west side, and a large sprawl to redevelop, this area is the sweet spot for entrepreneurs and a test site for some of PDX’s established brands. Here’s how to properly explore it. EAT Nong’s Khao Man Gai With two suitcases and $70 to her name, Nong left her homeland and became Portland’s poster girl…

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