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PC Gamer (US Edition)

PC Gamer (US Edition) March 2021

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PC Gamer brings you in-depth previews, exclusive feature stories, and the most hard-hitting reviews every month in the world’s best-selling PC games magazine! Every month you’ll get the inside scoop on the most exciting games in every genre from first-person shooters to MMORPGs and cutting-edge games from independent developers, along with detailed strategy guides, how-tos, and the latest news on mods and PC gaming hardware from the best-known authorities in PC gaming. PC Gamer helps you get the most out of the most powerful gaming platform in the world.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Limited US
Frequency:
Monthly
SUBSCRIBE
$19.99
13 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
“at the very least, this year’s looking great for pc gaming”

Specialist in Big lists Twitter @robinlvalentine This month Spent a lot of time looking at the Wikipedia page ‘2021 in videogames’. 2020 was a funny old yeah, eh? Well, maybe ‘funny’ is the wrong word. Regardless, we must forge on with the hope that 2021 might be a bit brighter – even if that does just turn out to be the light of the first nukes going off. At the very least, this year’s looking great for PC gaming. In our huge feature, we’ve run down a metric boatload of fantastic new titles coming in 2021. The future’s bright – just maybe don’t look out the window. ROBIN VALENTINE PRINT EDITOR robin.valentine@futurenet.com TALK TO PC GAMER Have your say! Email us at letters@pcgamer.com The PC Gamer team FRASER BROWN Specialist in Sword-based succession This month Glimpsed a grim vision of a corrupted,…

3 min.
sub standard

Subverse is a huge Kickstarter success story that crowdfunded over a million dollars, promising a sci-fi RPG where you recruit sexy aliens and then bang them. Since developer Studio FOW cancelled Early Access plans, players hadn’t seen gameplay yet—even though its first chapters are due early 2021. So there was anticipation for the first look at its “Tactical Grid Combat, Waifus and SHMUP Gameplay!”. However, that exclusive was given to a YouTuber, Arch, a controversial figure who used to post as Arch Warhammer until Games Workshop decided it wanted no association: It made Arch remove the word ‘Warhammer’ from his channel, and warned others not to work with him. When the Subverse reveal video was posted to Reddit, there was such backlash the mods eventually stated, “We will be automatically removing any…

1 min.
highs & lows

HIGHS Alphafold New AI, Alphafold, has made unprecedented advances in protein-folding. Planeception Developer Rami Ismail flew from Montreal to Amsterdam in a real plane, while piloting the same route in Microsoft Flight Simulator. Fornite The Galactus event ended up involving over 15 million players. LOWS Fortnite. again Epic announced there will be no in-person Fortnite events in 2021.. Monster Hunter The new Monster Hunter movie contains a joke that has angered the Chinese audience, and led to the review-bombing of Monster Hunter: World. RTX 3090 heist Thieves stole around $340,000 worth of RTX 3090 cards from an MSI factory in China.…

5 min.
hobbit forming

The Minecraft community continues to blow minds with its incredible builds, but even in that lofty company Minecraft Middle-earth stands out. This block-byblock recreation of JRR Tolkein’s world has to be seen to be believed. All of Middle-earth’s top hot-spots—and everything else—has been recreated in the blocky sandbox. You can take a quiet stroll through Hobbiton, delve into the depths of Moria, and so much more. Ever wanted to swan dive off the apex of Minas Tirith? I’ve done it—it’s awesome. Minecraft Middle-earth celebrated its ten-year anniversary last month, so I spoke with the server’s founder Nicky Vermeersch, also known as q220, about its humble beginnings, and why anyone in their right mind would take on such an ambitious build. Vermeersch was first introduced to Minecraft when it was still in beta in…

3 min.
small fry

The story of Overcooked begins at Cambridge Wizard School. At least that’s what Ghost Town Games programmer Oli DeVine calls it, with a knowing wink to the absurdity of the UK education system. Officially known as Cambridge University, it taught him two things: First, he didn’t want to be an academic. And second, local co-op wasn’t dead. “University can be quite an isolating experience,” DeVine says. “The thing that got me through it was having people round and playing videogames in my room, or going home and playing with my brothers.” The games industry had largely turned its back on shared screen experiences, necessitating complex setups with multiple consoles and TVs connected via LAN. “That was such a pain in the butt,” DeVine remembers, “but you’d still do that, because the experience…

5 min.
glass cannon

KNIGHTS OF THE OLD REPUBLIC II SET THE TEMPLATE FOR OBSIDIAN’S RUN OF TROUBLED, YET INSPIRED, RPGS The irradiated toilet bowl offers one of the bleakest dilemmas in Fallout: New Vegas. In hardcore mode, you have to stay hydrated in the desert or face dwindling stats and, ultimately, death. In a pinch, a gulp of 200-year-old piss water might just save your life. Temporarily, at least: In an interestingly ironic twist, the effects of radiation poisoning in Fallout are much the same as dehydration. It’s a literal poisoned chalice, the ultimate bad deal. Yet most players took it, glugging down the brown stuff at one point or another in order to survive. It’s the same dilemma faced by the large independent developer. Where small indies can keep costs low, and publisher-owned studios enjoy…