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Classic Trains

Classic Trains

Summer 2021
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CELEBRATE THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN RAILROADING – WHEN GIANT STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, COLORFUL DIESELS AND STEAMLINERS SHARED THE RAILS. CLASSIC TRAINS COVERS THE 1930’S THROUGH THE 1970’S WITH REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHY, DETAILED REPORTING AND FIRST-HAND ACCOUNTS FROM PEOPLE WHO WORKED THE GREAT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAINS.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequency:
Quarterly
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4 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
the most exciting sound

In the 1946 movie It’s a Wonderful Life, Jimmy Stewart’s character George Bailey declares, on hearing the cry of an approaching steam locomotive, that “the three most exciting sounds in the world” are “anchor chains, plane motors, and train whistles.” We couldn’t agree more — except that, with due respect to water and air travel, we’d put those train whistles, and all that they imply, first on the list. During the decade or so before Amtrak’s launch — now 50 years ago — it seemed as if train whistles might no longer be a part of the long-distance travel picture. Indeed, the preservation of rail service was arguably not Congress’s main motivation for creating the National Railroad Passenger Corp. Losses from passenger operations were dragging some railroads — notably the biggest…

2 min.
head end

WE MISS… Razor-sharp ballast edges, as here on the Lehigh Valley in western New Jersey in the 1940s. Wayne Brumbaugh Holiday surprise The Railway Club of Southern California’s “Apache Holiday” trip out of Los Angeles on the Santa Fe was a six-day blockbuster that included the Apache Railway, a logging line, the Grand Canyon — and a near-collision with a derailing Super Chief. It got off to an eventful start on June 26, 1948, when sander problems caused the special’s 4-8-4 to stall on Cajon Pass, requiring the assistance of the 4-8-2 and PA diesels on the following Grand Canyon Limited. Stan Kistler Facelift for the first E unit The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Museum has cosmetically restored a true landmark: B&O EA No. 51, the first E unit. Displayed at the Baltimore museum since the 1950s,…

2 min.
reviews

The Pennsylvania Railroad’s Muleshoe, Horseshoe, Altoona and Beyond By Ken Kobus and Gary C. Rauch. Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 148 pages. $49. Much has been published over the decades about the Pennsylvania’s shop town and operational hub of Altoona and, just to the west, the railroad’s climb to the summit of the Alleghenies. This album of more than 200 photos and maps shows that there’s still plenty of material that hasn’t been widely circulated. After an informative 10-page introduction, veteran PRR authors Kobus and Rauch present photos that take the reader up the mountain on the Muleshoe freight line, then back down on the main line via Horseshoe Curve. Then they devote 70 pages to the road’s myriad facilities in and around Altoona. — Robert S. McGonigal Chesapeake…

1 min.
visit us on the web

A new online experience! Check out our all-new website, Trains.com. Members have access to vintage photos, engaging first-person stories, vintage videos, profiles of Fallen Flag railroads, and more, including an archive of all back issues of Classic Trains and its special editions. Blog Read the weekly blog by our columnist Kevin Keefe, who reflects on the places he’s been, the people he’s met, and how railroading’s history impacts the industry today. Photo of the Day Enjoy a new photo from our collection each day. Trains.com members can see the full archive of images. Follow us on Facebook…

5 min.
firing on the nc&stl

I learned a lot from the Spring issue, but I would say the best was Doss Moore’s story [“First Run for an NC&StL Fireman,” page 30]. His story gave me insight into the days of steam on his first day on the job and the interaction with his engineer to get the train over the line from Nashville to Memphis. I moved to the Nashville area over 23 years ago, so I don’t know that much about NC&StL. The article gave me information not only on operations on the railroad but also on the J2 and J3 classes. I have never heard about the mechanical design of the forward driving boxes free play to glide through the curves and I’m surprised that other railroads didn’t use this design. I hope…

1 min.
“pennsylvania m1b 4-8-2” the prr had a fleet of 301 mountains

In 1923, the M1 was designed and built by the engineering department of the Pennsylvania Railroad. She was built at the famous Juniata Locomotive Shops in Altoona, Pennsylvania. The M1b was designed for dual service, both passenger and freight. It’s greatest value, however, was hauling heavy speed freight trains. M1b 6755 was saved from the scrapper’s torch for the Pennsylvania Railroad’s historical collection. It is now on display at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg. _ is beautiful limited-edition print of an original illustration is individually numbered and signed by the artist. _ is exquisite print is bordered by a museum-quality white-on-white double mat, measuring 11x14 inches. Framed in either a black or white 1 ½ inch deep wood frame, this limited-edition print measures 12 ¼ X 15 ¼…