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Cycling Plus

Cycling Plus March 2021

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Cycling Plus is the manual for the modern road cyclist. Whether you're cycling weekly, an occasional new rider or a Tour de France fan you’ll find everything you need. Each issue is packed with buying advice and tests of essential cycling gear - everything from bikes to bags! Cycling Plus is the place to find training advice, nutrition secrets and practical tips guaranteed to improve your bicycling. It's also full of inspirational rides, real-life cycling stories and entertaining riding-related features.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
BUY ISSUE
US$8.29
SUBSCRIBE
US$55.35
13 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
from the editor…

SUBSCRIBE! NEW SUBSCRIBERS TO CYCLING PLUS CAN GET A LEZYNE POCKET DRIVE MINI PUMP WORTH £25. ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER? Get access to exclusive content, competitions and offers. Turn to p60 For me, one of the biggest casualties of the past year has been a constructive lunch break. In nine plus months of working from home, I can count on the fingers of one hand the rides, runs, or even times I’ve left my desk for more than 20 minutes, that I’ve managed in the middle of the day. So, even if nothing else changes for a while, I’m determined to make 2021 the year of an active lunchtime. Rather than sitting at my desk with a disappointing sandwich, I’ll use the advice on page 62 and get some exercise! SUBSCRIBE TODAY FOR ACCESS TO EXCLUSIVE…

6 min.
going for gold

£9700 (circa £8900) Alberto Contador and Ivan Basso make their debut as bike designers Contador and Basso’s goal? To produce the fastest all-round road bike Alberto Contador and Ivan Basso are two former professional riders with big reputations and multiple Grand Tour wins between them. And with their collective 31 years of racing, El Pistolero and Ivan the Terrible have the experience, they believe, to launch their new bike brand, Aurum, into the very crowded and technically advanced realm of modern road (super)bikes. Aurum is Latin for gold and the name Magma is inspired by Mount Teide on the Spanish island of Tenerife where much of the developmental test riding of this bike took place. Core to the new bike’s creation, says Aurum, was input by the two owners. The goal, as you’d…

4 min.
lean, keen & supreme

£1999 Mid-range rocket from Switzerland If two thousand pounds seems a lot for an aluminium-framed bicycle, just look at the similarly priced Specialized Allez Sprint and Trek Emonda ALR models. At this price point, you’re buying the best alloy around. If you opted for carbon it would be more likely to be a brand’s second- or third-tier carbon, plus it’s not all that long since alloy bikes not as advanced as the ALR were winning tours. BMC is cagey about the grade of aluminium used, simply calling it “Teammachine ALR premium alloy”. Terms such as ‘hydroforming’ and ‘hidden welds’ often seem like box-ticking, but in this case the liquid shaping of the tubes is subtly aggressive, and the welds are smoothed without removing too much material. Tube butting is size-specific, meaning that…

5 min.
comfort and joy

£7050 Plush endurance bike with an e-kick Trek’s latest e-road bike is similar to its first Bosch mid-motor-equipped bike based around the Domane. Here, however, it has turned to an alternative German-made motor system. Out goes the heavyweight Bosch system and in comes the lightweight Fazua Evation, making this most modern of e-road bikes drop to just 13.8kg (58cm). And that’s not the full tale: the Fazua system is removable, so if you shell out for the optional down-tube cover (around £70), you’re left with a ‘standard’ bike just shy of 11kg. The Domane is the ideal choice for e-assistance as the chassis is highly versatile. Its on-road manners impress, while plush IsoSpeed front and rear design means it can handle light gravel duties, with the big-volume tubeless tyres playing their part,…

3 min.
cold facts

December saw the first-ever UCI Cycling eSports World Championships on Zwift take place, where many of the world’s top cyclists, including Anna van der Breggen, Rigoberto Urán and Tom Pidcock, competed for virtual racing’s rainbow jersey. It’s the cherry on top of the icing for Zwift in a year where it broke through into the mainstream of the cycling world, through circumstances – a global pandemic and all the stay-at-home orders it’s entailed – that nobody could have envisaged. In the spring, Zwift suddenly became the only racing, and in some countries the only riding, that anybody could do. I’ve embraced it over the last couple of seasons: riding 4621km and climbing 123,000 metres to date. This winter, however, I’ve stepped back into the real world. I’ll certainly be back on…

2 min.
stubble & co roll top

UK-based bag designer Stubble & Co has a new take on the classic roll-top backpack. The handmade Stubble & Co Roll Top is made differently to most. Rather than using heavyweight canvas like many of its rivals, Stubble & Co has opted for a lightweight material derived from recycled plastic. This makes for a waterproof 20-litre pack with all the features you’ll need that weighs in at just 980g. In contrast, Chrome’s highly regarded classic roll-top, the Barrage, tips the scales not far shy of half a kilo more at 1410g. The Stubble features two large pockets on the flanks with enough stretch to fit a large water bottle (and elasticated straps for retention). Twin compression straps enable you to stabilise the bag’s load, while inside there’s a padded sleeve (with an…