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Decanter

Decanter

June 2021
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Published by TI Media Limited The world’s best wine magazine. It is simply the “wine bible”. Every month it provides recommendations on the world’s finest wines and tells you where you can find them. From top Bordeaux to the best value wine on the shelf, Decanter guides you through a maze of wine to help you find the right wine for you. It also offers interviews with leading wine personalities, in-depth guides to the wine regions and the latest wine news.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
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12 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
welcome

Don’t pretend you’ve never done it. Relaxing, eyes half-closed, quite possibly after a very pleasant lunch, thinking ‘what if that beautiful little vineyard I visited recently came up for sale?’ Imagine how tranquil and pleasant your life would be – waking up to birdsong, a morning stroll around your vines, lunch with some good friends over a few bottles of your very own wine, afternoons by the pool... Then, of course there’s the reality. It’s a business, and can be a very tough one. Even if you manage to make it financially viable, there are still everyday problems and unforeseen catastrophes to deal with, such as disease, infestation, floods, fires or, of course, frosts – and all of our hearts go out to those affected by this month’s devastating weather in Europe. But…

5 min.
a month in wine

Late frosts devastate French vineyards French winemakers have warned that widespread spring frosts look to have damaged parts of the 2021 vintage in its infancy. Social media channels were filled with images of candles burning in vineyards in April, as winemakers in France and other parts of Europe sought to prevent sub-zero temperatures damaging young buds. Yet there were initial reports of serious frost damage in many French regions, from Bordeaux and Burgundy to Languedoc, Rhône and the Loire. France’s government pledged financial support from its ‘agricultural disaster’ fund to help wineries, which have already felt the economic impact of Covid-19 and US tariffs in recent months. Producers were still trying to assess damage as Decanter went to press, but Bordeaux’s wine council, the CIVB, said: ‘It’s already certain that the spring frost will severely…

1 min.
in brief

Convicted wine fraudster Rudy Kurniawan has been deported to his native Indonesia following his release from prison, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement have confirmed. Kurniawan, once nicknamed ‘Dr Conti’, was sentenced to 10 years in prison in 2014. His counterfeits of world-renowned wines conned wealthy collectors out of millions of dollars. Napa Valley’s Bill Harlan has announced a generational handover. His son Will has become managing director of family wine operations, overseeing Harlan Estate, BOND, Promontory and The Mascot. Cory Empting is now MD of wine-growing. ‘I shall continue in the role of founder and chairman,’ said Bill Harlan, adding that he’s spent 10 years helping ‘to set a course for the next four decades’. Cybersecurity experts have warned of a rise in ‘malicious’ wine-themed web domain registrations. Most threats…

1 min.
letter of the month

Cellar strategies I thought I would share with your readers how I have built a mixed cellar, based on independent reviews, with the help of Decanter. I started subscribing 20 years ago and decided then that each month I would buy a few bottles rated at 95 points or above (then 5 stars), for the cellar – or under the stairs at that time – setting myself a price limit of £x per bottle. At the same time, I would purchase a few bottles of ‘weekday wine’ for the kitchen rack, rated at 90-94 points (4 stars), with a lower price limit. While Bordeaux, Burgundy and Italy perhaps dominate, as a result of this approach I now have an eclectic cellar of white, rosé, red and sparkling wines, and have just added…

5 min.
your letters

2011, a fascinating vintage I can’t wait for Decanter to publish its usual ‘10 years on’ review of the Bordeaux 2011s. Not because it’s a great vintage like 2010, 2015, 2016, 2018 and 2019 – or even a very good one, like 2014 and 2017 – but because it was controversial. As a collector and reader, I still cherish the article by Andrew Jefford, bravely standing up to his critic peers ‘kicking the hell out of Bordeaux 2011’ as he eloquently put it. I have been collecting, tasting and reading up on this vintage ever since, trying to make up my own mind. Was the vintage simply unlucky to follow the legends of 2009 and 2010? Was it just an old-school vintage that needs more time in the bottle to come…

3 min.
andrew jefford

As I write in an article that will appear in the next (July) issue of Decanter, I’m still learning about the world of wine. My most recent lesson unfolded in northeast Italy – and it gave me a shock. The landscape is stunning, like a miniature version of the Peruvian Andes. In place of bare, snow-shawled mountains, though, are a succession of high ridges and a chaos of hump-backed, wood-topped hills. Little houses and hamlets are grafted as improbably as Inca citadels into the hillsides, while vapoury fillets of mist drift languidly over the valley bottoms. Every scrap of land ungobbled by the greedy forests is vineyard; every row of vines sits on its own grassy terrace. The effect is super-fecund: if you could hear vegetative growth, the scene would be…