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Vogue

IN LIVING COLOR

BLUE PERIOD

AN UNTITLED WORK FROM 1960.

In the 1950s and ’60s, Bronxborn photographer Garry Winogrand made a name for himself as a paparazzo of everyday people, capturing his subjects in private moments in public spaces. He documented laughing fits outside Madison Avenue shop windows, weary glances directed at police officers overseeing political protests, the anticipation just before the first bite of a street-vendor pretzel—hectic compositions that channeled the electric energy of New York City in the postwar period. Though most of his images were taken in black-and-white, Winogrand amassed a considerable, if little-known, color portfolio as well. The last significant outing for his color work was an ill-fated 1967 exhibition at MoMA, where the slide projector broke and wasn’t replaced, leaving most visitors oblivious to the artist’s more vibrant compositions. This month, the Brooklyn Museum will show nearly 500 recently uncovered color slides (a more affordable medium at the time when Winogrand was working), presented on seventeen (well-serviced!) slide projectors. Organized by Drew Sawyer, the museum’s curator of photography, the show will also explore a quieter side of Winogrand: “What we know him for are these action-packed shots on the street. But color film took much longer to develop than black-and-white,” Sawyer says. “It’ll be an immersive experience that showcases the breadth of his work in a way we haven’t seen before.

GARRY WINOGRAND (AMERICAN, 1928–1984). UNTITLED (NEW YORK), 1960. 35MM COLOR SLIDE. COLLECTION OF THE CENTER FOR CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY, THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA. © THE ESTATE OF GARRY WINOGRAND, COURTESY OF FRAENKEL GALLERY, SAN FRANCISCO

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