EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
GT Porsche

GT Porsche

October/November 2020

GT Porsche is the leading independent Porsche magazine for all owners, drivers and enthusiasts of Germany's most famous sports car maker. Packed full of the latest model reviews, buying guides, classic features, motor sport coverage and the latest news GT Porsche is a must for all Porsche fans. Produced to the highest standards GT Porsche combines the best writers with the greatest photographers and ground breaking design to bring you the very best Porsche magazine on sale today.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kelsey Publishing Group
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
then and now…

2020 marks exactly fifty years since Porsche’s most important victory in motorsport: winning overall honours at the 1970 24 Hours of Le Mans. Sure, the manufacturer had achieved class wins from its very first outing at Sarthe back in 1951, but scenes of the bright red 917 short-tail (driven by Richard Attwood and Hans Herrmann) taking the top spot kick-started a major story of success in France, resulting in nineteen overall wins for Porsche before the brand’s exit from LMP1 in favour of Formula E at the close of the 2017 season. We’ve brought together an overview of Porsche’s most iconic Le Mans machines in this issue of GT Porsche, and though it’s fun to look back on past glories, it’s important for us not to lose sight of the road…

15 min.
chapter and verse

Back in 1977, when Commodore was unveiling its PET all-in-one home computer and the world was having its ears beaten into submission by the Sex Pistols, Alois Ruf Jr was busying himself with the launch of Turbo Number One, the first of many Porsche-based production cars to roll out of RUF’s Pfaffenhausen workshop. Modelled on the ground-breaking 930 (911 Turbo), wearing Carrera RS 3.0 bodywork and dressed in dark green paint, Turbo Number One was a 930 on steroids — engine displacement was increased to 3.3 litres (well in advance of Porsche applying the same update to the 930), developing 303bhp at 5,500rpm, with 304lbft torque coming on song at 4,000rpm. Rolling on bespoke RUF rims and uprated Bilstein suspension, this mean green speed machine also upped the ante when…

3 min.
arrival of new 572bhp 911 turbo

his year marks the 911 Turbo's forty-fifth anniversary. The model has come a long way since the 930 burst onto the scene in 1975, though what was once the ultimate 911 is now positioned slightly down the pecking order thanks to the introduction of the higher-powered 911 Turbo S. We published our review of the 992-generation Turbo S in the last issue of GT Porsche (order a copy at bit.ly/issuesgtp), and almost as soon as we'd gone to print, a super-secret memo from Porsche revealed the imminent launch of the new 911 Turbo, which you see on the pages before you. Where the 992 Turbo S pumps out a blistering 641bhp and begs its driver to make constant use of launch control, the lesser-powered Turbo uses the same basic powertrain (3.7-litre,…

2 min.
porsche world mourns death of hans mezger

Porsche owes a huge amount of its engineering success to Hans Mezger, who passed away on 10th June, aged 90. There's the air-cooled flat-six boxer engine, for a start, plus the overall construction of the Le Mans-winning 917 prototype (read all about this momentous achievement on page 76) and its mighty twelve-cylinder engine. As if that wasn't enough, Mezger also created the TAG Turbo Porsche Formula One engine and is responsible for overseeing many more of Porsche's most successful race cars and powerplants, including the 911 GT1-derived force-fed flat-six powering the 996 and 997-generation 911 Turbos, a unit given the nickname 'Mezger' in reference to the man himself, though it's important to note his career designing engines for Porsche stretched all the way back to the 1960s. Mezger was born on…

1 min.
next phase of command works completed at bicester heritage site

Bicester Heritage, a Centre of Excellence for the historic motoring industry in the UK, has announced the completion of ‘Building 141’ in The Command Works – the latest development within the former RAF Technical Site. Built sympathetically and in-keeping with their Grade II-listed surroundings, the new buildings (ranging in size from 5,000ft2 to Building 141’s 17,000ft2) will create a host of new skilled employment and training. Occupying land which, just eighteen months ago, lay derelict alongside Skimmingdish Lane, The Command Works was once the location of the RAF Bomber Station’s ‘Works’ buildings, rail and coal yards and is situated behind the Station Headquarters, home of the Station Commander’s Office and Operations Block. This landmark development represents the first new buildings to be constructed at the best-preserved pre-war Bomber Station in…

1 min.
dakar rally introduces new classics category

From next year, the Dakar Rally’s organising body will be introducing a new category for classic vehicles. Vintage cars and trucks that would have competed in the Paris-Dakar Rally, as well as similar events held during the 1980s and 1990s, will be allowed to compete, as well as period-accurate replicas of classic Dakar rally machines. A less gruelling course will be presented than that laid out for new vehicles, but the same start and end points will be observed. If all goes to plan, the Dakar Rally will take place 3rd-15th January 2021. Keep 'em peeled for 959s!…