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Readers Digest AustraliaReaders Digest Australia

Readers Digest Australia April 2019

No wonder this is the world's most widely read magazine Hard-hitting, thought-provoking and entertaining, with unforgettable stories in each issue. This magazine is packed with features short enough to read in one sitting, but stimulating enough to keep you thinking for days.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Reader's Digest Australia PTY LTD
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14 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
holiday highs

HOLIDAYS ARE WHAT WE ALL WORK HARD FOR, carefully planning and saving to make sure everything is perfect. Often, that precious time out from our routine can give us some of the most unforgettable experiences – stories that are shared and retold countless times. When we asked our readers to share their most hilarious and memorable holiday mishaps, nothing prepared us for the enormous response. After sifting through the many submissions, we found the most relatable and compiled each into ‘14 Travel Mishaps You’ll Never Forget’ (page 32). My favourite involves one reader’s visit to the zoo, and her unexpected encounter involving an elephant and a packet of biscuits. On a more serious note, space and science fans will enjoy the compelling first-person account of astronaut Scott Kelly’s time on the…

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readers’ comments and opinions

The Placebo Effect ‘The Power of Fake Pills’ (February) made me wonder whether the results for medical trial participants from placebos, comes from the chance to be listened to and heard, not just moved on. At routine follow ups the patient has the opportunity to tell their story as more time is allocated permitting meaningful discussions with the medical staff – possibly even a team who can pool their knowledge to respond to any issues that may arise. To think that when somebody is interested in you and really cares about the outcome, can harness self-belief, even without any drugs being administered. VIV BROWN The Wonderful World of Walt Disney Thank you for the wonderful article on the film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (‘Unforgettable Snow White, ’ January). In the winter of…

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news worth sharing

Fisherman Makes Catch of a Lifetime – and Saves a Life Early one morning in October last year, Gus Hutt was fishing at a favourite spot at Matata Beach in New Zealand’s North Island’s Bay of Plenty. Spotting what he thought was a porcelain doll floating past, he reached out to grab it by the arm. “Never look back in regret – move on to the next thing.” RICHARD BRANSON’S BEST ADVICE FROM HIS MUM When he heard a ‘squeak’, Hutt realised it was an 18-month-old baby boy, who was floating at a steady pace, pulled by a dangerous rip in the water. Hutt’s wife searched the nearby holiday camp to find the child’s parents. Until the alarm was raised, they didn’t realise their toddler, Malachi Reeve, had opened the zip of his…

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ai system correctly predicts which coma patients will wake up

Amazing results have been achieved in Beijing, China, by a team of neurologists who used an artificial intelligence (AI) system to rate seven patients on a coma recovery scale. Despite the low scores the patients had received from doctors, meaning family members were legally allowed to take them off life support, the AI system from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and PLA General Hospital gave top scores to the patients. Their prediction? All of these patients would ‘wake up’ from their coma within a year. They all did. By using normally ‘invisible’ details to the human eye in hundreds of brain images and carefully calculated machine-algorithms, the team has reportedly achieved an 88 per cent diagnosis success rate for coma patients so far.…

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breakthroughs in genetically modified rice in asia

The Philippines-based International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) has secured funding through the Global Crop Diversity Trust to help the conservation and sharing of 136,000 varieties of the staple grain that feeds over 3.5 billion people daily. The Institute’s ‘gene bank’ is an essential factor in developing more sustainable and resilient rice to meet the threat of climate change issues on a global level, with the IRRI working towards making crops more resilient to issues such as rising seas and monsoon flooding. The IRRI collection includes wild rice species, which have been used to develop varieties that resist pests and diseases. Breakthroughs by agricultural scientists have also resulted in the creation of ‘scuba rice’ that can survive long periods of flooding.…

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loving our children

OUR FIRST CHILD, a beautiful healthy baby boy, was born in December 1992. Then, just 13 months later, we were blessed with a baby girl. Our beautiful son idolised his little sister and shared everything with her. Their bond was incredible. We were like any other family, very close and did a lot together. There were amazing holidays, trips to Bali and Thailand, and in 2000 we even took the kids out of school and travelled around Australia for six months in a caravan. We all loved going to the beach, fishing and bike riding and since the children were so close in age they did a lot with each other. Our son, being the eldest, was very loving and protective towards his little sister. They played and read books happily together. For…

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