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Road & TrackRoad & Track

Road & Track October 2018

Road & Track includes technical features on automotive subjects, wide-ranging feature stories, spectacular automotive art and standard-setting new-car photography, humor, fiction, travel stories, book reviews and the most comprehensive racing coverage offered by a monthly magazine.Bonus: iPad Interactive

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
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10 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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go

AND IT WAS GOOD Call it a gift wrapped in red tape. Lord March, desperate to revive racing at his Goodwood Estate’s historic track, seized upon a hill climb as a way to circumvent nettlesome noise restrictions. The first Festival of Speed, held in 1993, was a hit. It has run every year since, even after wheel-to-wheel competition for vintage cars resumed in the form of the Goodwood Revival. Part soiree, part auto show, part spectacle, the Festival of Speed entices automotive icons of every stripe to cut loose up the 1.16-mile course. A sculpture on the front lawn of Goodwood House in West Sussex, England, has become a fixture of the show. This year’s, by British artist Gerry Judah, celebrated Porsche’s 70th anniversary. MEET YOUR HEROES The festival’s silver jubilee (25th anniversary) drew…

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meet your heroes

The festival’s silver jubilee (25th anniversary) drew a remarkable roster. Every great series, every fabled marque; if it’s significant in motorsport history, it was there in some fashion. Spectators were treated to mid-2000s F1 machinery chasing Can-Am legends like the Chaparral 2G (above) up the hill, followed closely by early racing icons like the Fiat S76, better known as the “Beast of Turin” (right). It’s one of the few places to see such a wide variety of extraordinary vehicles in the wild.…

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feedback

DEAR R&T, RUSSIAN WRITER ANTON CHEKHOV ONCE WROTE THAT IN A PERSON, EVERYTHING SHOULD BE BEAUTIFUL—FACE, CLOTHES, SOUL, AND THOUGHTS. FROM THE SUBTLE ITALIAN FLAG ON THE COVER TO THE STUNNING PHOTOGRAPHY THROUGHOUT (GO, DISSECTED, SHOPS WE LOVE, AND ESPECIALLY THE EXPERIENCE), AND FROM THE DELIGHTFULLY TOUCHING STORY IN “LITTLE THINGS” TO THE INTELLIGENTLY BRUTAL REVIEW OF THE LAMBORGHINI URUS [“BULL MARKET”], THE JULY ISSUE WOULD MAKE GOOD OLE MR. C PROUD. MARTIN OMAR KITANOFF, SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA LAMBASTED Why does every Lambo review have to be framed as: “Lamborghinis used to be flamboyant, unattainable, and unreasonable. Now that their cars are less ridiculous, I (the reviewer) am disappointed”? This is an SUV, not a sports car. Saying it’s not great as a sports car is redundant. This is the Lambo for your kids…

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editor’s letter

ASK A GROUP OF ENTHUSIASTS what they enjoy most about their automobiles and you’ll get a range of answers as varied as the individuals themselves. For some, it’s the speed and performance—the thrill of driving fast. Others appreciate the aesthetic or engineering achievement, while many just enjoy the places a vehicle can take them, regardless of its speed, shape, or cutting-edge tech. Or maybe your dad just tinkered on old British roadsters, so you tinker on old British roadsters. There’s no right answer here. Car passion takes multiple, wonderful forms. Beyond the driving, there’s also customization and personalization of the vehicles themselves. Which brings us to the latest masterfully modified 911 from Singer Vehicle Design, their Dynamics and Lightweighting Study (DLS). In this month’s cover story (“Rare Air,” starting on page…

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careful whisper

IT FELT NORMAL RIGHT UP TO THE MOMENT where my feet hit nothing. “The pedals move,” Tom Plucinsky said. He reached into the car and pulled some lever or cable I couldn’t see, and the pedal box swooshed up to meet my feet. The whole megillah slid on a pair of tracks—brake and clutch and throttle and a little chunk of the floor. Which was nice, because I was immobile, belted tight into a fixed seat. As you can be, in a race car. Good, I thought. Now I have feet. I’ve always thought of my feet as friends. It was comforting to be in the presence of pals, even if our collective memory held a few disagreements regarding the required stinkiness of socks. The car, on the other hand, was not a…

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rare air

IT’S LIKE ONE OF THOSE UNSETTLING DREAMS WHERE everything seems familiar but nothing makes sense: The car is obviously a Porsche 911, instantly recognizable to serious students of the marque as a 964, manufactured from 1989 to 1994. But the details don’t compute. Extra-wide black fenders have been crudely riveted to tatty dark-blue bodywork in order to clear deep-dish Fuchs-style center-lock wheels, which exist only in the fevered imagination of Porsche fanatics. The white ducktail matches the roof’s color, but it belongs on a ’73 Carrera RS 2.7, not a 964. Pink zip ties serve as door pulls, and aluminum sound-deadening tape is slathered all over the unfinished interior. The car looks less like one of Magnus Walker’s Outlaw 911s than Dr. Frankenstein’s personal hot rod. But things get really weird…

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