EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / News & Politics
Time Magazine International EditionTime Magazine International Edition

Time Magazine International Edition September 3, 2018

Time Magazine International Edition is the go-to news magazine for what is happening around the globe. You can rely on TIME's award winning journalists for analysis and insight into the latest developments in politics, business, health, science, society and entertainment.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Time Magazines Europe
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
US$4.10
SUBSCRIBE
US$39
41 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
conversation

PRESIDENTIAL LIKENESS YOUR JULY 30 COVER, WHICH merged the faces of Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, has captured the depth of Trump’s fascination with his Russian counterpart. Trump sees Putin as a role model, the man he would like to become—the power, the control, the wealth, the lack of restraints, the self-confidence, the capability of being photographed shirtless. Your photo illustrator Nancy Burson sends a powerful message. Pattie J. Tobler, RICHMOND, VA. ONE SHOULD WONDER IF A photo “constructed” to satisfy editors’ objectives doesn’t imply that content might also be so “constructed” to satisfy their objectives. Just a thought! Tom Ostasiewski, TRINITY, FLA. BEYOND THE SUMMIT RE “A CRISIS OF HIS OWN Making” [July 30]: TIME can always be counted on to give a one-sided analysis of the news, and Trump’s Helsinki meeting with Putin was…

access_time1 min.
for the record

‘We accept the moral obligation of Germany, in whose name terrible injustice was committed under the Nazis.’ HEIKO MAAS, German Foreign Minister, on the U.S. deportation of former Nazi guard Jakiw Palij to Germany; the move came after a 14-year effort to push Palij out of his New York City home ‘Truth isn’t truth.’ RUDOLPH GIULIANI, President Trump’s personal lawyer, discussing on NBC’s Meet the Press whether Trump should testify to special counsel Robert Mueller; he later explained that he meant the statement as a description of a he-said, she-said situation, not “a pontification on moral theology” ‘A definite maybe.’ CHELSEA CLINTON, former First Daughter of the United States, on whether she plans to run for public office in the future ‘I HAD A BABY, I CARRIED A BABY, AND NOW I’M STILL WINNING AWARDS!’ CARDI B,…

access_time4 min.
at the u.s. border, a view from the bridges

‘When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back ...’ President Trump, in a June 24 tweet FOR MOST, THE GATEWAY INTERNATIONAL Bridge functions as it should, allowing people to get between the U.S. and Mexico. But on a hot Sunday afternoon, a dozen migrants at the mouth of the bridge weren’t getting anywhere at all. They had been told, once again, to wait. “For three days we have been sleeping on the floor and they have been telling us the same thing,” one of them, a man named Mbella, told TIME. “But every day, someone else goes and we remain here.” At a press conference the next day, Aug. 20, President Trump once again touted the border wall he has promised supporters. “The wall is…

access_time2 min.
greece enters post-bailout era, but has little else to cheer

AFTER EIGHT YEARS OF AUSTERITY AND European financial support, Greece officially exited its third bailout program on Aug. 20. For the first time since 2010, the country can “stand on its own,” according to the chair of the euro-zone bailout fund. “This is a day of liberation,” said Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, emphasizing that Greece must not forget the lessons of the crisis. But after years of political and social upheaval, starting afresh isn’t so easy. DEEP IN DEBT The global financial crisis of 2007–08 hit Greece hard. In 2010, the country revealed that it was running a deficit of over 14%, rather than the 4% it had misreported. Lenders’ confidence plummeted. With creditors unwilling to keep the country ticking, Greece was forced to request emergency loans from the E.U.,…

access_time1 min.
news  ticker

1 million flee record floods in India The heaviest rains in almost a century forced over a million people into relief camps in the Indian state of Kerala. Flooding has killed at least 410, and early estimates put damage costs at nearly $3 billion. Other nations offered aid, but India generally doesn’t accept such help. U.S. inmates stage national prison strike Prisoners across the U.S. went on strike on Aug. 21 to protest what they are calling “modern-day slavery.” They’ve said their conditions, such as being forced to work for far below minimum wage, are a human-rights issue. During the strike, which is expected to last nearly three weeks, inmates will not work or spend at commissaries. North and South Koreans reunited Eighty-nine mostly elderly South Koreans went to North Korea to reunite with relatives they…

access_time2 min.
why is measles returning to some places and not others?

BY NOW, MEASLES OUGHT TO BE OPTIONAL. As long as parents are conscientious and governments are competent, no child has to contract the sometimes fatal disease again. But across Europe and in the U.S., that’s not what’s happening. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were more than 40,000 cases of measles—including 37 deaths—across Europe in just the first six months of 2018. That’s a huge jump: in all of last year, there were 23,927 cases, and only 5,273 the year before. More than half of those 2018 cases were found in Ukraine, while six other countries (Serbia, France, Italy, Russia, Georgia and Greece) have each topped 1,000 cases. The U.S. numbers are less alarming—107 cases, across 21 states and the District of Columbia—but they too represent an uptick over…

help