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Travel + LeisureTravel + Leisure

Travel + Leisure

September 2019

TRAVEL + LEISURE™ is an indispensable guide to where to stay, what to eat, and what to do around the globe. Every month, TRAVEL + LEISURE™ puts easy trip ideas, itineraries, and insider information right at your fingertips. Get advice from our travel experts and view the magazine's award-winning photography. The digital edition of TRAVEL + LEISURE™ has all the tools you need to take you where you want to go.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time5 min.
letter from the editor

CONTRIBUTORS WORLD’S BEST RESTAURANTS (P. 17) When the New York Times’s Australia dining critic got the call from the editors at Travel + Leisure and Food & Wine asking if she wanted to go on a round-the-world adventure to document the globe’s top restaurants, she accepted immediately. Then she hung up and the fear started creeping in. “I have mainly written about restaurants in the countries where I’ve lived,” the Melbourne-based writer explains. “But this was much more extreme in the sense that I was being asked to assess restaurants in places where I was the outsider.” Rodell’s travels spanned four months and took her to 81 restaurants in 24 countries. And while she seldom spent more than a few days in each place, she still managed to fall head over heels…

access_time3 min.
world’s best restaurants 2019 opener

The. Whole. World. I COULD BARELY believe my ears when the call came. The editors of Travel + Leisure and Food & Wine wanted one critic to travel the globe to come up with a list of the best restaurants in the world. They wanted that person to be me. Of course I said yes—who wouldn’t say yes? But not for the reasons you might think. There are, of course, already lists. Some are chosen by groups of experts, others by voters around the world, still others by teams of inspectors. Each method has its pros and cons. What this list celebrates is cuisine and culture, not rankings and numbers. To have the globe reduced to one expensive multicourse menu after another is to miss out on a true taste of the world.…

access_time8 min.
north america

Blue Hillat Stone Barns POCANTICO HILLS, NEW YORK AT ONE POINT during your meal at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, parsnips might arrive at the table, strung up on something that looks like a medieval torture device. As they swing, a server will explain that parsnips are usually picked young, but these have been left in the ground for a full 18 months to freeze and thaw, then dipped in beef tallow and dry aged before being pressed with similarly treated carrots and served as parsnip and carrot “steak.” Who would think of such a thing? Who would take the year and a half to work this experiment, design a process for aging something that usually gets thrown into a stew? Dan Barber, that’s who. There are many moments like this during…

access_time4 min.
south america

MIL MORAY, PERU There’s one obvious reason people fly to Cuzco and venture through the Sacred Valley of the Andes: Machu Picchu. Now there’s another reason to make that trek. Perched on the edge of Moray, another Incan site, more than 11,800 feet above sea level, Mil is a true destination restaurant. It is that Incan legacy—plus the whole of the Andean countryside—that inspires chef Virgilio Martínez’s menu and ethos. He is no stranger to greatness. His restaurant Central, in Lima, has already won him numerous accolades. But Mil is an achievement on another level altogether. Mil is sparsely decorated, allowing the dramatic mountain light streaming in to provide the room’s tranquil mood. The meal is a series of eight “moments” that reveal the bounty of Peru’s ecosystems. The “plateau” course arrives in…

access_time8 min.
europe + the middle east

GANBARA SAN SEBASTIÁN, SPAIN The opportunities for eating well in San Sebastián are countless, but if you’re hoping to experience its unique dining culture, you’d best drink wine and eat pintxos. A cab driver told me that the best way to judge a place was by the size of the crowd spilling out onto the street. And the largest, happiest crowd is at Ganbara. Chef Amaia Ortuzar’s house specialty is wild mushrooms, sautéed with garlic and served with an egg yolk. The mushrooms are meaty and perfectly salted, the egg yolk rich and silken—this was truly one of the most perfect dishes I ate during my travels. One thing that elevates the restaurant is the lovely basement dining room, where you can have a full sit-down meal of Basque specialties like charcoal-grilled…

access_time4 min.
africa

4Roomed EKasi Culture CAPE TOWN THIS CITY HAS no lack of high-end, European- and Asian-influenced restaurants. Some of them are very good. There are wineries on the nearby Western Cape where you can have lunch overlooking vineyards, eating food that might lead you to believe you’re in California or France. But Cape Town is not in America or Europe. It’s in Africa. 4Roomed eKasi Culture makes no secret of that fact: what’s celebrated here is the food and culture of Africa, and South Africa in particular. It is located in the Khayelitsha township, about a 30-minute drive from the center of Cape Town. The restaurant’s name pays homage to the four-roomed houses in which chef Abigail Mbalo-Mokoena grew up, where multiple families cohabit and a communal culture of hospitality prevails. In a leafy…

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