EXPLOREMY LIBRARYMAGAZINES
CATEGORIES
  • Art & Architecture
  • Boating & Aviation
  • Business & Finance
  • Cars & Motorcycles
  • Celebrity & Gossip
  • Comics & Manga
  • Crafts
  • Culture & Literature
  • Family & Parenting
  • Fashion
  • Food & Wine
  • Health & Fitness
  • Home & Garden
  • Hunting & Fishing
  • Kids & Teens
  • Luxury
  • Men's Lifestyle
  • Movies, TV & Music
  • News & Politics
  • Photography
  • Science
  • Sports
  • Tech & Gaming
  • Travel & Outdoor
  • Women's Lifestyle
  • Adult
FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Photography
Photography Week

Photography Week

No. 383

The world's best-selling digital photography magazine, Photography Week is the ultimate resource for anyone who wants to improve their photography. Every issue we bring you inspirational images, creative ideas, must-try photo projects and in-depth video reviews, plus no-nonsense practical advice on how to get the best from your camera, so you can capture and edit images you can be proud of. Designed specifically for mobile devices, each issue features reader galleries, how-to articles and step-by-step videos that will help you become a better photographer. It's your one-stop shop for all things photographic.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Read More
SPECIAL: Get 57 extra issues FREE with your subscription!
SUBSCRIBE
$22.02
58 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
join the club…

Welcome to the world’s No.1 weekly digital photography magazine. If you’re already a reader, thanks for your continued support and involvement; if you’re new to Photography Week, you’ve come to the right place! In addition to expert advice, brilliant tips and step-by-step tutorials, every issue features interactive galleries of the best new photos, how-to videos on essential shooting and editing techniques, and in-depth reviews of the latest camera kit. But that’s not the whole story. Photography Week is more than a magazine – it’s a community of like-minded people who are passionate about photography. To get involved, just follow any of the links below and share your shots and comments – your photo might even appear on our cover! JOIN THE PHOTOGRAPHY WEEK COMMUNITY AND START SHARING! FACEBOOK http://tiny.cc/7s2zgy TWITTER http://tiny.cc/xt2zgy FLICKR http://tiny.cc/nv2zgy We’re more than just a magazine…

1 min.
hasselblad launches the super-lightweight xcd 4/45p

Hasselblad has announced what it claims is “the world’s lightest digital medium format autofocus lens on the market today”, the XCD 4/45P. The new optic weighs just 320g and offers a focal length of 45mm, and is designed to work with the Hasselblad X1D II 50C to provide a medium format setup that’s perfect for travel and street photography. The arrival of the XCD 4/45P means there are now 10 lenses in the XCD range. The new lens will also be compatible with the older Hasselblad X1D-50c once an upcoming firmware update is available. The wide-angle view offered by the The XCD 4/45P is equivalent to that of a 36mm lens on a full-frame sensor camera. It has a maximum aperture of f/4, and can be stopped down to a minimum aperture…

1 min.
winter landscapes

Currently living in north Texas, Mike is a self-taught photographer and has been shooting professionally for 10 years. Mike is, by his own admission, addicted to photography and adventure. He’s shot everything from landscapes to professional sports, natural disasters, concerts and aerial photography, and runs workshops throughout the year. For more on Mike’s photography, visit mikemezphotography.com The winter season, with its snow, ice and brutal temperatures, is really my thing. I relish every moment of it. Sure, I have to dress in multiple layers, deal with frozen eyelashes and the occasional snowfall down the back, but I am a lover of winter. Shooting in winter conditions can be extremely challenging, but also very rewarding. Sparkling snow drifts, unique ice formations, steaming lakes and so much more make shooting during the winter season…

3 min.
how, what and where to shoot

Finding that ‘perfect’ winter scene to capture usually involves a fair amount of planning and travel. When I think about winter photography, I know I’m off to the mountains. Living in Texas, we don’t get much of a winter, so I usually find myself heading to Colorado or up to Canada. The challenge in winter is that most of the landscape scenes you’d work with in any other season are different. The foreground you would normally have is now covered in snow, and those perfectly reflecting lakes can be a solid sheet of ice. For me, I love shapes in the fresh snow and details in the ice, so I tend to look for those elements first, and then work my composition from there, for example discovering methane bubbles trapped in…

3 min.
cold weather gear and garments

Shooting in winter is not for the faint-hearted, and comes with its own set of challenges. Your gear may not perform as well as expected, and getting to that perfect composition may require some trekking in deep snow, while blowing snow and freezing mist may coat your glass elements. So how do you best protect yourself and your gear? One of the first things you’re likely to notice when you’re out shooting is that your batteries drain much quicker in the cold weather. I suggest three different methods to help prolong battery life. The first is utilising Live View as little as possible: Live View already requires a lot from the battery, so using it in the colder temperatures only accelerates the draining process. Secondly, take spare batteries out of the camera…

3 min.
embrace the elements

Photography is all about timing: capturing the perfect light, the dramatic scene, the innocent moment – the list goes on and on. Many of those moments end up being missed, though, because photographers try to wait for the weather to clear and then head out to find a scene. I challenge you to try to embrace the elements, battle them, and capture the moments that occur in less-than-optimal weather, as well as the ones that come after. Some of my favourite winter images have been captured during blinding snowfall and frigid winds. Sure, the visibility may be lower in these conditions, but think outside the box. Focus in on the more minimal elements that are visible, including wildlife. Keep a long lens with you for those dramatic moments as breaks in…