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Photography Week

Photography Week No. 441

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The world's best-selling digital photography magazine, Photography Week is the ultimate resource for anyone who wants to improve their photography. Every issue we bring you inspirational images, creative ideas, must-try photo projects and in-depth video reviews, plus no-nonsense practical advice on how to get the best from your camera, so you can capture and edit images you can be proud of. Designed specifically for mobile devices, each issue features reader galleries, how-to articles and step-by-step videos that will help you become a better photographer. It's your one-stop shop for all things photographic.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Weekly
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52 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
join the club…

Welcome to the world’s No.1 weekly digital photography magazine. If you’re already a reader, thanks for your continued support and involvement; if you’re new to Photography Week, you’ve come to the right place! In addition to expert advice, brilliant tips and step-by-step tutorials, every issue features interactive galleries of the best new photos, how-to videos on essential shooting and editing techniques, and in-depth reviews of the latest camera kit. But that’s not the whole story. Photography Week is more than a magazine – it’s a community of like-minded people who are passionate about photography. To get involved, just follow any of the links below and share your shots and comments – your photo might even appear on our cover! JOIN THE PHOTOGRAPHY WEEK COMMUNITY AND START SHARING! FACEBOOK http://bit.ly/39py9lg TWITTER http://bit.ly/2vGadLP FLICKR http://bit.ly/2VIgsJO We’re more than just a magazine…

3 min.
fx3 is sony’s smallest and cheapest pro cine camera

The Sony FX3 has officially landed – and as expected, it’s the smallest, cheapest Sony cinema camera so far, and an exciting alternative to the excellent Sony A7S III. The FX3 looks like a bridge between Sony’s Alpha mirrorless cameras and its box-shape cinema cameras, offering cinema features and controls with the smallest body and the lowest price yet. Where Sony’s Alpha mirrorless cameras are essentially hybrid stills/video shooters, the FX3 is an out-and-out movie camera, complete with Sony’s Cinetone-S color science, a detachable handle with XLR audio input, integrated mounting points and a movie-specific control layout unlike anything on Sony’s existing Alpha models. While it look like an Alpha, the FX3 is actually the newest and smallest member of Sony’s Cinema line, with the VENICE at the top, the FX9 and the…

1 min.
sigma announces new 28-70mm f/2.8 for sony fe and l-mount

Sigma has announced a new, compact 28-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Contemporary lens for Sony FE and L-mount cameras. The company already makes a Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG DN | Art lens, but this is a larger, heavier model. The new lens is 40% lighter without compromising on build quality or performance, and should be a good match for smaller cameras, including the Sigma fp. Unlike the current generation of full-frame 24-70mm f/2.8 standard zooms, which are pretty big, the Sigma 28-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Contemporary strikes a balance between performance and portability, with an optical design based on the Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG DN | Art lens, but with a significantly smaller body – achieved with a slight reduction in zoom range at the ‘wide’ end, from 24mm to 28mm. The new…

1 min.
10 techniques for creative images

The technology and trends in photography are changing all the time, so keeping track of what’s new can be difficult. But learning new techniques, and mastering new styles, can help to give your photography a new spark. So we’ve come up with the top 10 techniques that you should try right now to help inspire your photography. Learning a new approach or trying a new style of photography is a great way to keep your images fresh – and developing your skills will help you to discover a visual style that’s unique to you. All 10 of our techniques will help you produce striking results, and you could even combine two or more together to come up with a whole new look. So all you need to do is get out your…

1 min.
01 underexpose the background

By underexposing the background and using flash to light your subject, you can create far more dramatic photographs. This technique for making your subject stand out has become popular among portrait photographers, but you can use it on any subject that you can light with your flashgun. Skills involved You can create this effect by using your camera’s automatic exposure modes and taking images with your on-camera flash, but you’ll get more consistent and reliable results using manual exposure and with the flash off-camera, using a flashgun and a remote wireless controller. The technique When you’re trying to achieve this effect, start by ignoring the flash and concentrate on setting the exposure for the background. To do this you simply set the shutter speed at the fastest setting that will work with your flashgun…

1 min.
exposure bracketing

One way of capturing high-contrast scenes is to combine exposures to create a HDR image. DSLRs and mirrorless cameras have an AEB (automatic exposure bracketing) feature, which allows the camera to quickly take three (or more) shots at different exposures without you having to touch the camera. This reduces the risk of the camera getting knocked between shots, making it easier to get a good result when you combine images using software. For most HDR images you should set AEB to shoot three frames, with the exposure set to +/-2 stops to capture the full range range of shadow and highlight detail. Once you’ve set the AEB function, you may need to press the shutter three times, so it’s best to use a remote release so that the camera stays precisely…