EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Crafts
PieceWork

PieceWork Summer 2020

PieceWork is the only magazine for those who love all things made by hand and the history behind them. Every issue explores the life and work of traditional needleworkers, takes an in-depth look at historical needlework techniques, and gives instructions for making heirloom-quality projects of your own.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Long Thread Media LLC
Frequency:
Quarterly
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$29.99
4 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
notions

Necessity is certainly the mother of invention, and skillful needleworkers of all types learn to ease in, let out, and make do. Whether knitter or crocheter, seamstress or tatter, all textile pursuits have their own dilemmas and (sometimes controversial) solutions. I love exploring the heady mix of problem-solving versus tried-and-true needlework rules across cultures and time. In this issue, Susan J. Jerome’s article on handsewn buttonholes highlights this push/ pull of innovation and tradition so well. Buttonholes were to be practiced, perfected, and judged; samplers might serve as a résumé for marriage or work. However, Susan also explains how buttonholes continued evolving and the wonder of a modern sewing machine. And I think many of us are equally interested in the techniques and traditions that were left behind. Sarah Wroot looks to…

1 min.
piecework us

EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Anne Merrow MANAGING EDITOR Laura Rintala EDITOR Kate Larson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Elizabeth Prose TECHNICAL EDITORS Lori Gayle, Deanna Hall West, Mary Polityka Bush COPY EDITOR AND CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Trish Faubion PROOFREADER Nancy Arndt CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Nancy Bush, Susan Strawn CREATIVE ART DIRECTOR Charlene Tiedemann PRODUCTION DESIGNER Mark Dobroth PHOTOGRAPHY Matt Graves STYLING AND ILLUSTRATIONS Ann Sabin Swanson FOUNDERS Linda Ligon, Anne Merrow, John P. Bolton PUBLISHER John P. Bolton MEDIA SALES Sommer Street Associates DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Haydn Strauss…

3 min.
by post

Paper Dress Until I saw Beverly Gordon’s article [“A Most Valuable Fabric: Crepe Paper in the Early Twentieth Century,” page 10] in the Spring 2020 issue of PieceWork, I knew nothing about the popularity of crepe paper in the early 1900s. I wonder if my great-aunt, who was a dressmaker, used it in some of the ways described in the article. Elizabeth Sadak Holic (1891–1976), known by me as Aunt Betty, owned a dressmaking shop in Chicago, Illinois, from the 1920s to the 1950s. Family stories tell that she made very elegant gowns. When I began kindergarten in the late 1940s, my favorite dress was lime and dark green. Around that time, Aunt Betty presented me with a six-inch crepe-paper version of the dress. She had stitched it onto a piece of…

1 min.
necessities

Nature’s Palette The local flora of Vermont and natural dyestuffs from more temperate climates color the hand-dyed floss from The Felting Studio of Neysa Russo. Shown in cotton and available in silk and wool, too. www.thefeltingstudio.com Maker’s Mark With a stroke of the ergonomically designed Hera Marker from Clover, mark your next sewing project—no messy ink residue to rinse out later. www.clover-usa.com Heirloom Stitches Skacel kept traditional knitters and crocheters in mind when designing their HiKoo Merino Lace Light. Available in three classic colors, this fine yarn shows off lacy stitches beautifully. www.skacelknitting.com Beekeeper Stitch in vintage style with FripperiesMP’s Bee Skep and keep your floss and threads accessible and tidy. Each one is crafted from local hardwoods. www.retromanticfripperie.etsy.com Magnetic Minder Clasp a Kit-tea Cat Needle Minder by Grandma Girl Designs onto your work in progress. Each one offers…

3 min.
remitts

It all began with a personal challenge: take $100 of seed money and see how much good you can do. The year was 2009, and oncology nurse Janet Tupy, who had not sewn since high school, was inspired by a pair of felted wool mittens she found in a gift shop. She enlisted a couple of friends to help, located a pattern, and spent $100 on wool sweaters at a thrift store. Their goal was to raise $1,000 for local food pantries by making and selling felted wool mittens. That first year, they raised $4,000 and ran out of mittens. Fast forward eleven years, and ReMitts has raised more than one-third of a million dollars, with the proceeds going to food pantries in the Madison, Wisconsin, area. In 2019 alone, ReMitts…

5 min.
a stitch in time

The herringbone stitch belongs to the large cross-stitch family and has many aliases—Mossoul, Russian, Russian cross, catch, Persian, witch, fishnet, and plaited stitch. The most commonly used name appears to be herringbone, with the basic completed stitch resembling the backbone structure of the herring fish, commonly found in the North Atlantic Ocean and possibly pointing to the origin of this name. History records the herringbone stitch was in use by the 1500s, although it was probably used earlier. English samplers and blackwork patterns of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries employed this stitch because it is reversable. Needleworkers used this stitch in English crewelwork of the mid-seventeenth century, American crewelwork of second half of the eighteenth century, and American samplers of the nineteenth century. The herringbone stitch was used extensively to adorn seams…