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Popular PhotographyPopular Photography

Popular Photography April 2016

Popular Photography brings you step-by-step secrets of the pros for taking their most amazing shots. You’ll discover the best equipment at the best prices, get comprehensive comparative reports on cameras, lenses, film, digital equipment, printers, scanners, software, accessories and so much more. Get Popular Photography digital magazine subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
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IN THIS ISSUE

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winner’s circle

The fun starts on the cover of our subscriber edition and takes off in earnest on page 53. Each of the category winners earned $250 and their story in our pages; we will pay the Grand Prize winner $1,000 for coming out on top. Every year I find myself surprised not just by the quality of so many of the submissions but also by the photographs that emerge as the winners. I just wish we had room—and prize money—to showcase more winners! Our editors discovered a lot of terrific photographers whose work we’d never seen before. Judge for yourself by looking through our galleries of finalists at PopPhoto.com/contest2015. Although this year’s edition is labeled the 22nd Annual, our competition goes all the way back to the roots of this magazine—we’ve been showcasing…

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vagabond voyage

Cameron Davidson, a corporate and editorial shooter based in Alexandria, Virginia, has compiled a photo bucket list: locations, subjects, and adventures he wants to experience before hanging up his camera for good. Last year he crossed one off his list when he booked passage on a freighter and sailed across the Atlantic from England to the Caribbean—12 days of shooting ship and sea. His main photo challenge? Finding something new to say about cargo ships. The solution was shooting from every possible angle, including straight down from outside his cabin for this disorienting photo. He used a Sony Cyber-shot RX100 at approximately 50mm (full-frame equivalent) and exposed for 1/100 sec at f/5, ISO 80.…

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true picks

Full-Frame Fancy PENTAX K-1 This DSLR brings the rugged design Pentax built its name on to full-frame. A 36.4MP CMOS anti-aliasing sensor is integrated into the body with a five-axis stabilizer and creative applications like its Astro Tracer stellar mode. A pentaprism viewfinder and twisting LCD screen are fun surprises for those ready for a new system or using decades of old glass on a new 35mm-format body. $1,800, street; us.ricoh-imaging.com Action Shooter KODAK PIXPRO SP360 4K Kodak’s first 4K-resolution addition to the action camera market sports a 12.8MP CMOS sensor and records video for up to an hour onto a microSD card. Its wideangle lens covers a 235-degree field of view to shoot footage in time lapse, high speed, and semi-spherical video modes. $500, direct; kodak.com Multi-Pack TAMRAC HOODOO 20 Available in orange, blue, and green, this…

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star power

STANDOUT SPECS SENSOR: 24.2MP Exmor CMOS (APS-C-sized) BURST: Up to 11 fps for up to 21 RAW frames EVF: 2,359,296-dot OLED viewfinder SCREEN: Tilting 3-inch 921,600-dot LCD DIMENSIONS: 4.8x2.8x1.9 inches WEIGHT: 0.9 lb with battery and memory card PRICE: $998, street, body only INFO: sony.net WHAT TO DO when following up on the best-selling interchangeablelens camera in the world? If you’re Sony, you boost the autofocus system, add metering and improved tracking AF to the top burst speed, and throw in 4K video and HD slow-motion capture, too. With the A6300, Sony’s new APS-Cformat ILC does just that. Its 24.2MP sensor, essentially the same pixel count as the earlier A6000’s 24.3MP, doesn’t try to push resolution further. However, this is a newly developed sensor, using copper wiring to shrink the wiring layer while speeding up the sensor readout to allow…

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trigger happy

THE INCREASING demand for wireless studio lighting equipment has opened a market once dominated by just a few companies. New flash transmitters and receivers offer high-tech triggering for low prices. Here are a few options. 1 Nissin Air R Receiver $70 Made to work with the brand’s Di700A speedlight or Air 1 commander module, this receiver lets you use Nissin flashes that otherwise lack radio-remote capability. It features TTL compensation and high-speed shutter synchronization up to 1/8000 sec. HOT: Works on eight radio frequency channels in the 2.4 GHz band. NOT: Its 30-meter range may be too short for some uses. nissindigital.com 2 Hahnel Captur Transmitter and Receiver Kit $85 This transmitter/receiver kit comes configured for Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, on Sony camera systems. The receiver can be cabled to a strobe or communicate…

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roadside treasures

CONVERSATION, INSPIRATION, CONTESTS, AND YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED SERVING AS dwindling remnants of a lost chapter of American culture, some lone freestanding rest stops still remain untouched, nestled on the outskirts of major highways. Upon hearing that these architectural gems were being slowly and consistently demolished, photographer Ryann Ford sprang into action to catalogue their unique stories before they vanish into rubble. Ford is a Southern California transplant living in Austin, Texas, and working as a freelance architectural and interiors photographer. She has been shooting since she was a curious 12-year-old playing with her father’s camera, and now, at 34, she holds a degree in photography from Brooks Institute, from which she graduated in 2003. Ryann Ford See more on ryannford.com and in The Last Stop published by powerHouse. The Last Stop series was an idea…

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