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category_outlined / Photography
Popular PhotographyPopular Photography

Popular Photography June 2014

Popular Photography brings you step-by-step secrets of the pros for taking their most amazing shots. You’ll discover the best equipment at the best prices, get comprehensive comparative reports on cameras, lenses, film, digital equipment, printers, scanners, software, accessories and so much more. Get Popular Photography digital magazine subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
3rd place $100 prize

MATTHEW CLARK, 30, SURF PHOTOGRAPHER, SEAFORD, NY (WWW.CLARKOGRAPHY.COM) “This was the last day of a 10-day boat trip through the Mentawai Islands of Indonesia. We found this small slabbing reef break earlier in the trip and decided to go out and shoot one more time before we headed back to Sumatra. I had to swim underwater before the wave broke, turn back towards the shore, and shoot as the surfer travels through the barrel. I love the detail of his fingertips through the back side.” TECH INFO: Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Sigma 15mm f/2.8 fisheye in SPL Waterhousing; 1/1250 sec at f/8, ISO 1000 (+0.67). Exposure adjustments in Adobe Photoshop CS6. 2nd Place $200 Prize ROMAN KRUGLOV, 38, HELP DESK MANAGER, BROOKLYN, NY (WWW.RKWORLD.COM) “Walking by 135 East 57th Street…

access_time2 min.
how to succeed with glass

FOR TWO solid weeks in 2012, Taka Kawachi, a product specialist who works out of a studio in Nyack, NY, shot nothing but glassware for a major department store chain. Juice, highball, and shot glasses, tumblers, stemware of every size and shape, and, yes, pilsner glasses and beer mugs. If he wasn't a master of lighting glass at the project's outset, he certainly was by its end. To light this frothy stein, Kawachi said his challenges were threefold: He wanted to highlight the mug's transparency while exaggerating the amber glow of its contents; to capture the concave texturing of the mug's surface; and to bring out the mug's outer edges to define its contours. Here's how this still-life pro handled each of these tasks. Highlighting transparency: Kawachi used the classic technique of…

access_time4 min.
step 1

WE'VE BEEN hearing rumors of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom's mobile version for a while now, and so we are very happy that its first iteration has been released. With this new app, you can sync your photos between computer and iPad, make edits offline, and share images on social media. An online gallery will let you display (but not edit) those collections from any computer that is connected to the Internet. This is clearly an early release. As of press time, there was no iPhone version, much less one for Android. And features such as star ratings have not yet been integrated (but you can flag your favorites). Still, setting up the app is simple and seamless, and in its first version is incredibly useful. How much does it cost? If you're signed…

access_time2 min.
step 1

TRYING TO photograph cats is a lot like trying to herd them—great for laughs, but usually unproductive. To help you kick up the quality of your kitty captures, we got some advice from one of the best pet shooters in the country, Gary Parker of San Jose, CA (www.CatDogPhotography.com): Use the right gear. Parker works with the longest lens possible: sometimes a 50mm f/1.2 but more often a 70–200mm f/2.8. The latter will nail a moving cat from across the room in good existing light. He also suggests a wide angle zoom (e.g., 16–35mm f/2.8) “so that when kitty is cool with you being up close, you can zoom in and out as needed.” Cameras with high burst rates are mandatory, at least 5 frames per second. Be prepared. “Cat photography is…

access_time3 min.
1 the drake passage

SOUTH AMERICA TO ANTARCTICA Here's an opportunity to photograph Mother Nature on her best and worst behavior. The Drake Passage, that 500-mile strait separating the southern tip of South America and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, is at the whim of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which carries a volume of water 600 times larger than the Amazon. The result can be powerful weather that can lead to menacing, 50-foot waves—fun if you want to photograph fierce storms. A few days of nausea are worth it. When the Southern Ocean calms, from the prow of the ship you can watch albatross circle and the sun throw flames across the sky as it sets—sometimes for five hours. And then there's the prize: Antarctica. For what amounts to little more than rock, ice, and…

access_time3 min.
1 antelope canyon

ARIZONA Any photographer who has been tempted by the American Southwest has heard of Antelope Canyon. The natural Navajo cathedral is an intricate maze through a sandstone slot canyon where, if you time it right, you can capture a ray of sunlight shining through the curved whorls like a beam from a light saber. As with any attempt to capture magic, you'll need just the right combination of patience and lucky timing. Since it sits on the Navajo Nation, Antelope Canyon requires a guide. Six companies offer tours, which limit the amount of time each photographer can take in the canyon because space in the slots is very limited. We recommend taking a 10:15 a.m. two-hour photography tour with Charly Moore, owner of Overland Canyon Trails (packages start at $125; overlandcanyontours.com). He's spent…

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