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category_outlined / Sports
PowderPowder

Powder January 2016

You never know when the next perfect powder day will come, so until then, pick up Powder Magazine for your ski runs. From dissecting the steepest, most technical first descents, to lofting big air, Powder transports you with award-winning photography and engaging articles that will take you to the top of the mountain.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Media Operations, Inc
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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48" all time

MYOKO, JAPAN JANUA RY 23, 2015ANOTHER CYCLE OF WEATHER IS MOVING THROUGH MYOKO TODAY, AFTER A RAINY AND GENERALLY GRAY THURSDAY. WE’VE GOT WIND, SNOW, AND POOR VISIBILITY.—SNOW JAPANDuring a particularly dry winter in their native Pacific Northwest, photographer Grant Gunderson and KC Deane returned to the tiny haven of Myoko for some much-needed face-shot therapy. The friends have been under Japan’s spell for five seasons, returning each year to explore the island nation’s many volcanoes. “It’s the only place in the world I know I will go every year,” says Gunderson, “and I will go every year for the rest of my life because it’s that good.” Myoko sits on a large active volcano, boasting huge glades of Japanese Maple and access to rowdy backcountry zones. The forecast for…

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moments from winter

MAYBE YOU DON’T DO THIS, but I’m guessing you do. When it has been a while between great days in the mountains, I’ll rifle through the photos on my phone looking for my favorite winter moments—a buddy buried in a turn, dawn light on an early morning skin, new friends in a strange, unexpectedly snowy place. It’s an entirely self-indulgent practice, but those sacred moments are the reminders we need to justify everything else that comes with this lifestyle, like arduous work hours throughout the summer, seasonal relationship challenges, general financial instability, and lots of ramen.Forget all that, because you have these snapshots, which provide their own sort of meaning and fulfillment. They explain who we are and why we are here. It’s not about nostalgia or living in the…

access_time9 min.
klondike king

PLOWING THROUGH SHIN-DEEP DRY SNOW on the first day of our Alaskan expedition, on a potential first descent, I can’t help but feel lucky. My five trip mates and I make graffiti of the white canvas, slicing and carving the slope into a scribble of tracks. At the bottom, big toothy grins beam, high fives fly, and poles clink.PLOWING THROUGH SHIN-DEEP DRY SNOW on the first day of our Alaskan expedition, on a potential first descent, I can’t help but feel lucky. My five trip mates and I make graffiti of the white canvas, slicing and carving the slope into a scribble of tracks. At the bottom, big toothy grins beam, high fives fly, and poles clink.This is why we’ve come so far north—to find a grand adventure and the…

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WOMEN TO CHERISH IN YOUR LIFE:THE MATRIARCHPAGE 40She takes care of her family and community, like Elizabeth Lamphere, who started a nonprofit to support people who are grieving the loss of loved ones to avalanches and other hazards in the mountains.THE COOL MOMpage 46She brought you into this world. She makes your friends snacks. She cleans up your messes, and when you’re old enough, she helps you buy your own ski resort, like Cyndy Sisto, the new coowner of Snow Ridge in New York.THE GIRL NEXT DOORpage 48She’s cute in that comfortable way. She keeps you honest and conveniently lives down the street, kinda like the ski shop. But she won’t live there forever.THE GIRL YOU WANT TO BRING HOME TO MOMpage 52She’s more impressed by your turns than your…

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the nest egg

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS WE LIKE: ALPINE INITIATIVES; HIGH FIVES; AVALANCHE CENTERS; POW; THE SLUSH FUND.THREE WEEKS BEFORE HE DIED in an avalanche on Loveland Pass—along with four other men in one of the deadliest avalanches in Colorado history—Ian Lamphere proposed to his girlfriend, Elizabeth. The ring he offered consisted of braised sterling silver wrapped around a white stone. The stone was special; he had found it himself while mountain biking around their home in Crested Butte. The ring reflected Ian’s creativity, depth, and ingenuity, and symbolized his and Elizabeth’s connection to the outdoors, which they planned to instill in their 8-month-old daughter, Madelyn.The Sheep Creek avalanche, which occurred on April 20, 2013, has since become a case study in awareness, prevention, and human factors—specifically, how five experienced backcountry enthusiasts, who were…

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coming home

The good side of working with Mom: PB&Js always at the ready. The bad side: Definitely not skipping Mass. Cyndy Sisto, with her son, Nick Mir. (NICOLA RINALDO)THERE ARE SOME CALLS YOU HAVE TO PICK UP. Like that one from your doctor after a week in Vegas, or from your buddy with the season tickets to your favorite team. But what about the one from Mom asking if you want to buy a ski resort? It was the latter that blew up Nick Mir’s cell phone in the summer of 2014. His mom, Cyndy Sisto, had a solid lead on a little mountain named Snow Ridge that was on the block in Central New York. During their time at Toggenburg Mountain outside Syracuse, where Sisto, 60, worked and skied for…

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