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Flying

Flying November 2017

The sharp wit and experienced judgment of Flying’s experts cover all the challenges and rewards that aviation offers to all flying enthusiasts. From industry news updates, regulations, trends, air shows and events to carefully researched reports on all categories of airplanes, helicopters, avionics, products, technology, accessories and equipment to pilot technique, flight training, safety, weather, operations and maintenance.

País:
United States
Língua:
English
Editora:
Bonnier Corporation
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3 minutos
do millennials want to learn to fly?

The conventional wisdom about millennials goes something like this: They would rather sit inside and play Xbox all day than go to the airport and learn to fly airplanes. Mind you, nobody ever presents any evidence to show this is in fact true, but in our gut we all kind of understand there’s at least a ring of truth to it. But don’t blame young people. A great many of them would be thrilled to earn a private pilot’s license. It’s just that general aviation isn’t structured to provide them with the kind of training experience they expect or desire. What do millennials want from aviation? It’s pretty simple, really: New, or nearly new, technologically sophisticated airplanes that they can actually afford to fly. What do they get instead? Locked airport…

3 minutos
inbox

TAXI AT LARGE AIRPORTS LIKE A PRO I enjoyed Bret Koebbe’s article regarding navigating ground ops at large and complex airfields [“Taxi at Large Airports Like a Pro,” August]. On a recent visit to Dallas Love Field — my first — traveling with my college-bound high school senior to tour universities in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area, I imagined the next level of technology. KDAL is under a tremendous renovation. Accompanying this infrastructure improvement was a laundry list of taxiway closures along with other notams regarding ground operations. It was daunting. I made notes using ForeFlight’s edit feature before departure. I fly a Cirrus SR22 with Garmin Perspective, so my available reference material is about as good as general aviation can deliver. But I did get mixed up on arrival. With a Southwest…

1 minutos
bush pilot bag

You don’t need to be a regular backcountry flier to get use from Flight Outfitters’ Bush Pilot bag. This rugged softshell bag is designed to carry everything you need for a flight, including a sizable space for an overnight stay should unexpected weather conditions or a maintenance event leave you grounded. The bag is made of durable canvas, leather and metal, with soft felt lining to protect your valuable flight gear. In addition to carrying straps, the Bush Pilot includes a padded shoulder strap, making it easier to carry if you have to walk or if you load the bag with heavy stuff. The bag itself weighs 3.5 pounds. $139.95 at aircraftspruce.com SIDE POCKETS Large side pockets on each end of the bag are designed to fit headsets. All pockets are lined with…

1 minutos
portable weather

Garmin’s new GDL 52 combines GPS, ADS-B and Sirius XM to provide a full package of data to a portable tablet or smartphone, and even some panelmounted avionics. The wireless device connects to iPads and smartphones through Garmin’s Pilot app as well as Garmin’s portable GPS systems, such as the aera 660, 795 and 796. It also links to the G3X touchscreen avionics suite and can be hard wired to the displays. Up to two devices can use the GDL 52 data concurrently. Passengers can listen in on Sirius XM audio channels either through a Bluetooth headset or compatible audio panels. Garmin boasts a five-hour battery life for the GDL 52. Available for $1,199 at buy.garmin.com. GPS The GDL 52 incorporates GPS, providing constant position information. This feature is not available on the…

4 minutos
trending

PERLAN GLIDER REACHES NEW HEIGHTS The Airbus Perlan 2 glider has reached a new high, breaking the world record for a nonpowered flight as it soared to 52,172 feet. The previous record was set in 2006 by the first version of the Perlan, which reached 50,727 feet with the Perlan Project’s founder Einar Enevoldson and lead project sponsor Steve Fossett at the controls. An Aero Boero AB-180 towplane pulled Perlan’s chief pilot Jim Payne and copilot Morgan Sandercock off the ground at Comandante Armando Tola International Airport, which sits at an elevation of 669 feet in El Calafate, Argentina. The area around El Calafate is one of only a few places on Earth where mountain waves combine with a high-altitude polar vortex — a phenomenon critical to providing enough lift to take a…

3 minutos
flight management systems

FMS began life as a computer tasked with automating the process of building a flight plan from numerous waypoints. The latest FMS units are integrated throughout much of an air transport category aircraft’s avionics suite. The modern FMS’ ability to utilize WAAS GPS technology gives it unparalleled vertical and lateral approach guidance capabilities. Flight management computers can auto-tune the variety of nav frequencies demanded on a cross-country flight. Today’s FMS is capable of blending GPS navigation with VOR, VOR-DME and inertial navigation when needed. The flight management system (FMS) aboard many air transport category aircraft today debuted on early Boeings in the 1970s. The original FMS was nothing more than a computer used to automate the regular navigation chores of entering multiple latitude/ longitude waypoints demanded by the flight director and autopilot to follow a…