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Cultura & Literatura
Henry VIII

Henry VIII

Henry VIII - Special

The second-born son of an upstart monarch, Henry VIII was never meant to be king. So how exactly did this prince in the shadows rise up to become the most notorious sovereign of England? In the All About History Book of Henry VIII, delve into the dramatic story of King Henry’s rule, and uncover the consequences of ruling with his heart, not his head. From the infamous six wives and the feuds of Henry’s disinherited daughters to the king’s war-mongering ways and the birth of the Henrician Reformation, discover how Henry VIII’s impulses almost left his nation in tatters.

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidade:
One-off
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1 minutos
welcome to   henry viii

The second-born son of an upstart monarch, Henry VIII was never meant to be king. So how exactly did this prince in the shadows rise up to become the most notorious sovereign of England? Over the following pages, delve into the dramatic story of King Henry’s rule, and uncover the consequences of ruling with his heart, not his head. From the infamous six wives and the feuds of Henry’s disinherited daughters to the king’s war-mongering ways and the birth of the Henrician Reformation, discover how Henry VIII’s impulses almost left his nation in tatters.…

19 minutos
building the tudor camelot

In 1578, the clergyman Nathaniel Baxter was unable to contain his disappointment with England’s shameless literary habits: “We see some men bestow their time in writing, some in printing, and more men in reading of vile and blasphemous, or at least of profane and frivolous books, such as that infamous legend of King Arthur.” The English, Baxter grumbled, were still addicted to tales of, “Lancelot du Lac, Tristram de Lyones, Gareth of Orkney, Merlin” and all the rest, but it was surely time to turn against “the horrible acts of those whore-masters.” These sententious sentiments found a receptive audience in the more puritanical corners of Elizabethan England, but they would have caused great puzzlement a century earlier. At the dawn of the Tudor age, King Arthur’s literary and cultural stock could…

2 minutos
the winchester round table

At the risk of ruining a good story, the famous oak Round Table at Winchester has no direct connection with the ancient kings of 6th-century Britain but it is, nonetheless, a fascinating artefact. Weighing in at roughly 1,200 kilograms and with a diameter of 5.5 metres, the table still hangs in the Great Hall at Winchester Castle. Modern scholarship suggests that the table was constructed at some point between 1250 and 1350, though opinion concerning the precise date is divided. One popular suggestion is that Edward I commissioned the table for a tournament in 1290 held to celebrate the forthcoming marriage of one of his children. The table was first mounted in the great hall during the reign of Edward III and was unpainted but with a decorative cover. The early Tudor…

2 minutos
who was thomas malory?

Malory, the son of a notable Warwickshire family, lived a decidedly un-Arthurian life. Everything began respectably enough (military service during the 1440s in France, a period as an MP) but beginning in the mid-century, Malory embarked on a staggeringly wide-ranging criminal career. Allegations against him included, but were not limited to, cattle rustling, extortion, rape, theft from an abbey and planning to ambush and murder the Duke of Buckingham. In the chaotic political world of the 1450s, Malory spent years moving between prisons, enjoying periods on bail and launching escape attempts with varying degrees of success. He never actually stood trial for any of his supposed crimes and, with the Yorkists’ rise to power in the early 1460s, a reversal of fortunes seemed likely. Malory served with Edward IV during the…

4 minutos
henry viii’s   hit list 1509-1526

THOMAS CROMWELL Faithful before his dramatic fall b.14 85-d.1540 Friend or Foe? Friend Born in south London, Cromwell was a self-confessed “ruffian” as a young man. After running away from home aged around 15, he served as a mercenary in the French army and later lived in Italy and the Low Countries. Around 1515, he returned to England and served in the household of Cardinal Wolsey. Under Wolsey, his career flourished and he became an MP in 1523. By this time, Henry had been married to Catherine of Aragon for over a decade and she hadn’t had a son. After a string of miscarriages and stillbirths, Henry’s attention had wandered and he was drawn to Anne Boleyn, who was young, beautiful and feisty. The king was determined to make Anne his new queen. Wolsey…

17 minutos
lover, gambler, cruel tyrant?   young henry

Henry VIII was a monster who single-handedly revolutionised the religious and social structure of England, plunged the nation into needless wars and ruined the economy – a condemnation few historians would disagree with. The second Tudor monarch left his successors a complex and unstable legacy, the implications of which took decades to sort out. But all this turmoil – the marriages made and unmade, the plundering of the church, the religious policy, the wars with France and Scotland, the profligate expenditure – all relate to the last 13 years of Henry’s life. If we really want to understand this monarch, we need to widen our focus, and particularly to consider his earlier life. What influences in his childhood, teenage and early manhood years turned him into a tyrant? The first thing…