Cultura & Literatura
Heretics and Holy Wars

Heretics and Holy Wars

Heretics and Holy Wars

As the Crusaders headed into battle, there was no doubt in their minds as to why they were marching into war – it was to show the glory of God. This wasn’t the first time conflict had raged in the name of religion, and it was by no means the last. Ever since antiquity, deities and beliefs have caused some contention. Pagans and Christians were at loggerheads in Ancient Rome, while the Reformation saw new heresies sweep across Europe and tear nations in two. In All About History Heretics and Holy Wars, meet the reformers who changed the face of religion and go to the frontlines of the battles that were won for gods and ideals. Uncover the truth behind the Spanish Inquisition, and find out why the Qatif Conflict was restarted after nearly 30 years of peace. Explore the famous Crusades, and finally get up to date with the holy wars that are still raging around the world today.

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Future Publishing Ltd
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1 minutos
welcome to heretics and holy wars

As the Crusaders headed into battle, there was no doubt in their minds as to why they were marching into war – it was to show the glory of God. This wasn’t the first time conflict had raged in the name of religion, and it was by no means the last. Ever since antiquity, deities and beliefs have caused some contention. Pagans and Christians were at loggerheads in Ancient Rome, while the Reformation saw new heresies sweep across Europe and tear nations in two. In All About History Heretics and Holy Wars, meet the reformers who changed the face of religion and go to the frontlines of the battles that were won for gods and ideals. Uncover the truth behind the Spanish Inquisition, and find out why the Qatif Conflict…

8 minutos
the kitos war

When Pompey the Great seized Jerusalem in 63 BCE, he restored King Hyrcanus II with limited powers and celebrated his victory in outlandish style by entering the Holy of Holies – the inner sanctum of the Temple that only the Jewish high priest was allowed to enter. It was a fitting symbol of Rome’s forthcoming relationship with its growing Jewish populace. Having repelled a Parthian invasion of Palestine, the Romans later installed the puppet king Herod in 37 BCE. After Herod’s death in 4 BCE, Judea was divided among his three sons, before Augustus established it as an official Roman province in 6 CE. Power was increasingly siphoned by the empire, until, by the time of Herod Agrippa II, the ‘king’ was little more than a figurehead ruling scattered pockets of…

1 minutos
the first roman-jewish war

In 66 CE, the Roman procurator Gessius Florus raided 17 talents of silver from the Temple treasury in Jerusalem “for Caesar’s needs”. In response, Jews began walking around the city carrying an empty basket and begging for change in open mockery of the procurator. Outraged, Florus marched on the city, demanding the jokers be handed over. When the Sanhedrin refused, the procurator sent his men into the southwest quarter of the city. Jews of equestrian rank were rounded up, tried, scourged and crucified, with 3,600 dying in a single day. In response, crowds barricaded the streets and pelted soldiers from the rooftops, running the procurator out of Jerusalem. The governor of Syria sent an army to put them down but he was promptly routed and his surrendering soldiers murdered. The Romans returned…

12 minutos
a faith divided: heresy in the roman and byzantine empires

At the beginning of the 2nd century CE, Ignatius of Antioch found himself en route to Rome, where he was destined to become one of the first great martyrs of the Christian Church. His journey as a prisoner was unpleasant, courtesy of the thuggish imperial officers who accompanied him – he compared them to vicious leopards. But Ignatius carved out some time to write letters to the fledgling Christian communities scattered around the Mediterranean. He insisted, over and over again, that they all shared a duty to “be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgement”. Any who dissented were to be denounced as heretics – people who “mix up Jesus Christ with their own poison like those who administer a deadly drug in sweet wine”.…

1 minutos
circumcellions: the club-wielding heretics

The Donatist movement was the cause of many headaches for the self-styled arbiters of orthodoxy, but the so-called Circumcellions received a particularly bad press. If we are to believe the terrible stories (and caution is required here), these rural bands wandered around the North African countryside seeking martyrdom and beating up anyone who offended them. They were, Augustine wrote, “men most notorious for their outrages”, which allegedly included attacking imperial troops and dragging wealthy landowners from their carriages. For Filastrius, bishop of Brescia, they were a “death sect” composed of men who sought martyrdom by any means possible. They would throw themselves from cliffs and rooftops, drown themselves, and ask perfect strangers to stab them in the belly in order to achieve what they regarded as a holy death. We…

1 minutos
the hidden knowledge of the gnostics

Picture the scene: a peasant and his brothers head off to caves near the town of Nag Hammadi in search of special soil they use to fertilise their crops. They come across a large earthenware vessel, smash it open, and out tumble ancients manuscripts. It turned out that these texts – 52 in all – were genuine artefacts of the heretical Gnostic movement. A few fragments of Gnostic writing had been found before, but this was one of the largest scholarly windfalls in the history of theological study. The texts – often puzzling – included the alternative Gospels of Thomas and Philip, sayings attributed to Christ that never made it into the official New Testament, and musings on creation, salvation, the soul and ritual behaviour. Prior to this discovery we…