Cultura & Literatura
History's Greatest Mysteries

History's Greatest Mysteries

History's Greatest Mysteries

Over 500 years ago, two young brothers disappeared, seemingly off the face of the Earth. These weren’t just any boys, however – one was Edward V, king of England, who had recently been declared illegitimate and quickly usurped by his uncle, Richard III. After their strange disappearance, rumours of murder spread through the country, with suspicions falling upon the boys’ uncle as well as other power-hungry figures at the royal court. To this day, debate rages about the curious fate of the Princes in the Tower. From this Medieval murder mystery to the unsettling transmissions from Cold-War-era radio stations, uncover history’s most fascinating and peculiar unanswered questions. Will we ever crack the code of the Voynich Manuscript? Who really was Jack the Ripper? What’s the truth behind the Bermuda Triangle? Pick up a copy to see if you can solve history’s greatest mysteries…

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Future Publishing Ltd
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1 minutos
welcome to history's greatest mysteries

Over 500 years ago, two young brothers disappeared, seemingly off the face of the Earth. These weren’t just any boys, however – one was Edward V, king of England, who had recently been declared illegitimate and quickly usurped by his uncle, Richard III. After their strange disappearance, rumours of murder spread through the country, with suspicions falling upon the boys’ uncle as well as other power-hungry figures at the royal court. To this day, debate rages about the curious fate of the Princes in the Tower. From this Medieval murder mystery to the unsettling transmissions from Cold-War-era radio stations, uncover history’s most fascinating and peculiar unanswered questions. Will we ever crack the code of the Voynich Manuscript? Who really was Jack the Ripper? What’s the truth behind the Bermuda Triangle? Read…

14 minutos
murder in the tower

It was a balmy summer’s night in the dark twisting corridors of the Tower of London as Edward and Richard, the two young sons of York, slept soundly. A sliver moonlight fell upon their golden hair from a high window, and all was silent. Fast asleep in bed, their hands clutching each other for comfort, they barely stirred as the door opened with a creak. A figure slipped through the entrance. Stepping lightly, he swept up a feather pillow and slowly approached the beds before lunging forward, firmly holding the pillow over the older boy’s face until his breathing stopped. Then he moved to the younger child. In a few minutes the deed was done, and the figure slunk back into the darkness and out of sight. This story entered the…

1 minutos
countdown to murder

A KING DIES After suffering from a short illness, Edward IV dies. The reason for his death is a mystery, with rumours of a possible poisoning as well as typhoid considered. 9 April 1483 THE LAST JOURNEY His son Edward V and the royal party leave their home at Ludlow to travel to London for his coronation. 24 April 1483 A ROYAL ENTRANCE Edward enters the capital with his uncle, Richard of Gloucester. They are greeted by the mayor and hundreds of citizens. 4 May 1483 FINAL RESIDENCE Edward is moved into the Tower of London, which is the usual place for kings to stay prior to a coronation. 19 May 1483 THE BROTHERS REUNITE After previously being held with his mother and half-siblings in sanctuary in Westminster, Richard joins his brother at the request of the Duke of Gloucester. 16 June 1483 A NEW…

1 minutos
pretenders of the throne

PERKIN WARBECK Warbeck claimed he was Richard in the court of Burgundy in 1490, saying that he had been spared by his brother’s murderers due to his young age, but swore to not reveal his identity. His claim was supported by Richard’s sister, Margaret of York, and he gained support from various monarchs, most notably James IV of Scotland. However, after hearing the king’s army was advancing towards him, he fled. He was eventually captured and taken to the Tower of London after being paraded through the streets to be made an example of. He was imprisoned alongside Edward, Earl of Warwick, the nephew of Edward IV and Richard III, and when the two of them attempted to escape in 1499, he was hanged. LAMBERT SIMNEL When the young Lambert Simnel was taken…

1 minutos
a deadly rumour

Margaret Beaufort, Henry VII’s mother, is another name that has been linked to the murders, but a more compelling theory is that although she didn’t kill them, she began the rumour that Richard did. With her focus on the interests of her son, Beaufort enlisted the help of Woodville and Buckingham to drive the autumn rebellion and place her son on the throne. The rumour of the boys’ deaths and Richard’s connection to it certainly started a domino effect that led to Henry VII’s rule, and this very well may have been due to his mother, as the ultimate spin master, working behind the scenes to tarnish Richard’s name and prompt people to flock to her son’s side.…

13 minutos
who killed henry darnley?

In the early hours of 10 February 1567, a violent explosion ripped through the air in the area of Edinburgh’s Cowgate. Those who rushed to the scene discovered that the provost’s lodging of the church of St Mary in the Fields (Kirk o’ Fields) had been reduced to a pile of rubble. That was terrible enough, but when people scoured the ruins in search of survivors, they came upon something much more sinister. The church complex was adjacent to the city wall. In an orchard beyond the boundary, some 14 metres from the church, lay two bodies – one was that of Henry Darnley, husband of Mary, Queen of Scots. Had the royal consort and his body servant, William Taylor, been killed by the blast that had hurled them into the…