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MediciMedici

Medici

Medici

From bankers and money-lenders to grand dukes, popes and queens, the Medici rose to become one of the most powerful and influential ruling families in Italy and Europe. Over the following pages we explore the fascinating story of their rule, from their rise to power under Cosimo de’ Medici to their decline and demise over 300 years later at the hands of Gian Gastone. We take a trip back to Florence, the playground of the dynasty, to discover what life was like during their rule and chart the rise and fall of the Medici Bank. As patrons of the arts, Florence’s ruling family were also responsible for overseeing and influencing history’s greatest cultural revolution, funding some of the most important works of Renaissance artists and thinkers, such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Galileo Galilei. Not everyone was a fan, however, with the rival Pazzi family attempting to unseat the Medici in a bloody coup that backfired terribly on the conspirators. Read on to discover more about the secrets, schemes and scandals of this fascinating family and their rule.

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Future Publishing Ltd
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NESTA EDIÇÃO

access_time1 minutos
welcome to medici

From bankers and money-lenders to grand dukes, popes and queens, the Medici rose to become one of the most powerful and influential ruling families in Italy and Europe. Over the following pages we explore the fascinating story of their rule, from their rise to power under Cosimo de’ Medici to their decline and demise over 300 years later at the hands of Gian Gastone. We take a trip back to Florence, the playground of the dynasty, to discover what life was like during their rule and chart the rise and fall of the Medici Bank. As patrons of the arts, Florence’s ruling family were also responsible for overseeing and influencing history’s greatest cultural revolution, funding some of the most important works of Renaissance artists and thinkers, such as Leonardo da…

access_time1 minutos
medici

Bookazine Editorial Editor Dan Peel Designer Briony Duguid Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Editorial Director Jon White Magazine Editorial Editor Jon Gordon Designer Kym Winters Cover images Getty Images Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9001…

access_time16 minutos
the rise of the medici

It was not the sort of accommodation Cosimo de’ Medici was used to. The name, alberghettino means ‘little inn’ but there was nothing cosy about the stone cell with its single window looking down from the Arnolfo Tower of the Palazzo della Signoria (now called the Palazzo Vecchio). The richest man in Europe spent almost a month locked up in the ‘little inn’, from 7 September to 3 October 1433. But Cosimo was not entirely surprised at the turn of events. And while he looked out over the red-tiled houses of his city, Florence, his agents were working to secure his release from prison before those plotting against him could secure the sentence of death they wanted. The Medici had not always aroused such fierce enmity. According to the tale later…

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condottieri: soldiers for hire

The city-states of northern Italy were faced with a problem: they had grown rich from trade, but they didn’t have the resources or manpower to retain standing armies large enough to fight the almost constant skirmishes and wars that plagued Italy from the mid 14th to 16th centuries. So they put their money to work and bought soldiers. The mercenary captain negotiated a deal on behalf of him and his men, signing a condotta (‘contract’) with the city-state they agreed to fight for. So the mercenary captain became a condottiere, a contractor, and his men condottieri. Foreigners led and manned the first of these companies, an Englishman, Sir John Hawkwood, being the most famous of the captains of these ‘free companies’, but by the end of the 14th century Italians were…

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the handwriting that became typewriting

Among the many exceptional scholars whom Cosimo de’ Medici became friends with was Poggio Bracciolini. The son of a poor apothecary from a village near Florence, Poggio had managed to scrape together enough money to enrol at the Studio Fiorentino and was swiftly spotted for his exceptional abilities. A master of Latin and Greek, he entered into the service of the Church, serving seven popes during a long career as papal secretary. Through his travels, Poggio scoured monastic libraries for old works. Among his many discoveries was the only surviving copy of Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura. When he couldn’t buy the manuscript from the owner, Poggio would copy it in a famously clear and legible hand. Cosimo so admired Poggio’s writing that he ordered all his books copied in the same…

access_time14 minutos
florence and the medici

Florence and the Medici were almost synonymous from the 15th century until the early 18th century, with the family dominant in a city that they shaped to reflect their own glory. Florence, which is around 170 miles from Rome and stands on the banks of the River Arno in northern Italy, was a prospering city long before the Medici. The city itself, which was walled, had a Roman origin, although it was a small settlement in ancient times. Little of Roman Florence now survives, with the population declining dramatically in the period after the fall of the Roman Empire. The city began to grow in importance in the early Medieval period, with the Margrave of Tuscany moving his seat to Florence in the mid-11th century. Several monasteries had already been founded in…

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