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Teach Yourself Image EditingTeach Yourself Image Editing

Teach Yourself Image Editing

Teach Yourself Image Editing

Post-processing is often an afterthought, especially for new photographers. However, it’s an essential part of the image-making process and time should always be allocated to it. Even at the most basic level, images that have been shot by a DSLR need to be sharpened a touch if the DSLR has an anti-aliasing filter. Image processing software also helps with the organisation and archiving of digital images. Teach Yourself Image Editing is packed with in-depth and informative tutorials that will take you through both Lightroom and Photoshop essentials. We’ll also briefly look at other editing programs, plug-ins and common editing mistakes. Once you’ve mastered the basics of Lightroom and Photoshop, delve into the more advanced feature on retouching for polishing your images to perfection, and discover how to perfect your own unique editing style.

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Future Publishing Ltd
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teach yourself image editing

Post-processing is often an afterthought, especially for new photographers. However, it’s an essential part of the image-making process and time should always be allocated to it. Even at the most basic level, images that have been shot by a DSLR need to be sharpened a touch if the DSLR has an anti-aliasing filter. Image processing software also helps with the organisation and archiving of digital images. Teach Yourself Image Editing is packed with in-depth and informative tutorials that will take you through both Lightroom and Photoshop essentials. We’ll also briefly look at other editing programs, plug-ins and common editing mistakes. Once you’ve mastered the basics of Lightroom and Photoshop, delve into the more advanced feature on retouching for polishing your images to perfection, and discover how to perfect your own…

access_time1 minutos
teach yourself image editing

Future PLC Richmond House, 33 Richmond Hill, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH2 6EZ Editorial Editor Rebecca Greig Designer Rebekka Hearl Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief content officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9001 Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR) www.futureplc.com Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman…

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introduction to image editing

Image editing, in regards to photography, is the process of manipulating a photograph visually in order to change or improve the appearance. In analogue photography this would be done in a darkroom where the photographer could adjust exposure, alter dark and light areas and retouch small sections of the image before fully developing the photograph. In the digital world this is more easily done nondestructively, as you are able to keep the original image intact, and even undo processing steps. The principal variables you might control during image editing are as follows: size, shape and orientation; exposure across all tonal values; vibrancy of colour, or specific colours; sharpness; correction distortions associated with optical errors, such as chromatic aberration and vignetting; and other special effects. Image-editing software is now affordable for most…

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10 essential editing techniques

We often talk about ‘essential’ techniques in the context of both taking photographs and then processing them in software. For even the most experienced digital photographer however, this term can seem a little opaque, with a level of uncertainty about what exactly constitutes essential in this case. While there is a great degree of personal judgement involved in deciding what shooting and processing actions are required for an image, there are some ‘tricks of the trade’ that must be employed in order to create the quality of images demanded by the world today. These cover the key elements of a successful image – correct exposure, balanced colour for a natural appearance and critical sharpness where it is most needed, such the eyes in a portrait. Other staple processing steps in…

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work with raw

It is generally accepted that a RAW workflow should be the choice of most professional photographers. Unless there is a specific reason for choosing JPEG as a file format, such as maximising memory card space and buffer capacity, RAW files offer far greater flexibility. There is still some confusion amongst photographers surrounding the actual advantages offered by RAW, however. Unlike JPEGs or even TIFF files, RAW images contain all of the data captured by the imaging sensor, including full colour information. This allows changes to be made to white balance at any time and in a manner that is similar to in-camera colour temperature selection. The true benefit is that of future-proofing – any adjustments made can be revisited and altered indefinitely, without loss of image quality and risk of…

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when to use photoshop

With as many colour and tonal changes made to your RAW files as possible, most images will have to be brought into Photoshop, in order for the finishing touches to be added. As accomplished as many RAW converters have become, they do not feature the vast range of retouching tools found in Photoshop and so are unsuitable for high-end work in this area. The following techniques make use of the most dynamic components of the program, layers and brushes, which cannot be currently supported in Camera Raw, Lightroom or Capture. These allow complex modifications to be made very precisely, on a highly local basis – brushes in ACR work in a similar way to Photoshop brushes, but offer nowhere near the same level of sophisticated control. There is also the…

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