Cultura & Literatura
The Story of the Normans from BBC History Magazine

The Story of the Normans from BBC History Magazine

The Story of the Normans from BBC History Magazine

Marking the 950th anniversary of the 1066 Battle of Hastings, this BBC History Magazine collector’s edition traces the Normans’ journey from Viking raiders to rulers of England Inside you will find: ◆ A timeline of the key milestones in Norman history ◆ In-depth explorations of the Bayeux tapestry and Domesday book ◆ Dramatic accounts of the Norman Conquest and its aftermath ◆ Amazing photos of Norman architecture ◆ Biographies of some of the key figures in the Norman world ◆ The story of Norman adventures in southern Europe and the Middle East ◆ Expert analysis of the Normans’ legacy in Britain

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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1 minutos
welcome

“ It is surely the most famous date in English history. On 14 October 1066 William of Normandy’s army defeated and killed King Harold at the battle of Hastings. It was the decisive moment in the Norman conquest of England, which heralded the end of the Anglo-Saxon era and brought profound changes to the country whose effects are still felt today. To mark the 950th anniversary of William’s great victory, we’ve put together this collector’s edition, which charts the history of the Normans, from their Viking origins to the reign of their last English monarch. You will discover how the rulers of a small patch of land in northern France managed to conquer the powerful Anglo-Saxon realm, and spread their wings even further afield to the Mediterranean and the Middle East.…

7 minutos
the normans

911 According to later writer Dudo of Saint-Quentin, in this year the king of the Franks, Charles the Simple, grants land around the city of Rouen to Rollo, or Rolf, leader of the Vikings who have settled the region: the duchy of Normandy is founded. In return Rollo undertakes to protect the area and to receive baptism, taking the Christian name Robert. 1002 Emma, sister of Duke Richard II of Normandy, marries Æthelred (‘the Unready’), king of England. Their son, the future Edward the Confessor, flees to Normandy 14 years later when England is conquered by King Cnut, and remains there for the next quarter of a century. This dynastic link is later used as one of the justifications for the Norman conquest. 1016 A group of Norman pilgrims en route to Jerusalem are ‘invited’…

10 minutos
who were the normans?

The Normans were the violent parvenu opportunists of their day: Vikings who settled in Normandy and became French before conquering England and becoming English. From obscure Scandinavian origins, the Normans relied on their military proficiency – and ruthlessness – to dominate the institutions and elites of Europe, and assimilated cultures, ideas and whole political systems in their pursuit of glory. Norman knights and generals occupied areas from the lowlands of Scotland to the deserts of the near east, thrusting themselves into the midst of conflicts and seizing chances whenever they appeared. They also left behind some of the most remarkable ecclesiastical and military architecture of the period, which speaks volumes about both their self-importance and their piety. Where did the Normans come from? The people who became Normans burst on to the historical…

10 minutos
normans throughout europe

Robert proved to be an excellent warrior, staying with the main crusading force all the way toJerusalem and attacking opposing armies headon The Normans stride across the pages of 11th- and 12thcentury European history as larger-than-life figures, like the ones so vividly depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry. Whether in the British Isles, southern Italy and Sicily, Spain, or on the Crusades, the Normans strutted their stuff. Their own historians celebrated their military exploits under charismatic leaders such as William the Conqueror, Robert Guiscard, Bohemond, and Roger II, first king of Sicily. Later historians too have been inclined to accept their significance, not only in the military and political spheres but also in the worlds of government, scholarship, and in the medieval church. How then are we to explain the impact of relatively small…

4 minutos
norman influence in europe

1 London It was already much the most important English city in the late 10th century when it became the headquarters of King Æthelred (‘the unready’), whose kingdom faced repeated attacks by large and well organised expeditions from Denmark. These eventually succeeded in taking both the city and the kingdom. In 1066 the city did not immediately surrender to the Normans, but then decided to come to terms. The Normans added to the Roman walls by constructing castles, of which the largest and most famous was the White Tower (Tower of London), built to impress. The city continued to grow as a centre of trade and commerce. The Norman kings based themselves outside the walls at Westminster, where a large palace was built near the abbey church, and where the court of…

12 minutos
female power behind the thrones

Gunnor was ‘born from magnificent stock, beautiful to look at and attractive… hard working and wise in all matters’ – and also had a very good memory This article might best begin by paraphrasing a popular bon mot: ‘behind every successful Norman man was a brilliant woman’. Here I will focus on four of them: Gunnor (c950–1031), Emma of Normandy (c985–1052), Matilda of Flanders (c1031–1083) and Sichelgaita (1040–1090). We are fortunate that enough evidence survives from the 11th and 12th centuries to provide insights into the lives, activities and roles expected of the women who married Normans, or who were themselves Norman and married into other ruling houses. Chronicles such as the History of the Normans by Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and works by Orderic Vitalis, Amatus of Montecassino and Anna Comnena, furnish…