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Yachting MonthlyYachting Monthly

Yachting Monthly

June 2019

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd Yachting monthly is at the heart of the British yachting market and is for people who actively sail their boats - whether cruising across the channel, around the coast or further a field in blue waters. It provides an entertaining mix of vital information for cruising yachtsmen with all levels of experience, which maximises their enjoyment, increases their skills and gives them the confidence to broaden their horizons.

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
TI-Media
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seaworthy thinking

What makes a seaworthy boat? A long keel, heavy displacement and a well-protected rudder? That’s been the assumption for many years, borne out by sailors’ experiences of survival in some pretty horrendous conditions. A well-found yacht’s ability to take a beating and keep sailing is highly desirable.Yacht design has changed dramatically over the last 50 years, however, driven by racing innovations as well as a desire for more space and comfort (p60). Does this make modern boats less seaworthy? Interestingly, the recent Golden Globe Race, in which competitors were exclusively sailing long-keeled boats without modern technology, had a higher attrition rate than events in which carbon fibre soap dishes are raced at speed through the same waters.Perhaps seaworthiness isn’t just about the ability to take a storm on the head.…

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sailors advised to check older gps

News editorSailors who have GPS receivers and systems using GPS chips for both position and UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) are being advised to check their accuracy if they are more than 10 years old.The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) has issued a safety bulletin about the so-called ‘week number rollover event’, which was expected to occur on 6 April 2019.GPS systems count time in weeks after 6 January 1980. The week number is stored as a 10-bit binary number which allows for a maximum of 1,024 weeks (19.7 years) before resetting to zero.This can cause the time on devices to show either 19.7 years ahead or behind the actual time. Some systems could rollover on a different date to 6 April 2019 due to the implementation in the manufacturer’s firmware.The…

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raising awareness of standards

Servicing is based on the expiry date of equipment stowed inside (Graham Snook)Concerns that some liferafts in the UK are being serviced without meeting the required standards has prompted the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) to write an open letter to the industry.Liferafts for leisure sailors are currently governed by International Standards Organisation (ISO) rules, under ISO 9650. The MCA said servicing of ISO 9650 liferafts for use on UK small commercial vessels, such as charter yachts and training vessels, should be carried out based on the expiry date of equipment inside.It also highlighted that a record of all inspections should be kept by the service station, and the date of the service, the name and stamp of the station and signature of the service engineer should appear on the…

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news in numbers

80Sir Robin Knox-Johnston has celebrated his 80th birthday and was expected to mark the 50th anniversary of finishing the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race by re-enacting his finish off Falmouth on 22 April.44Spirit Yachts has started building the all-electric Spirit 44E, which will be fully electric with solar panels and no hydrocarbons onboard.02For the second year running, Premier Marinas has retained its Investors in People gold accreditation for best practice in the workplace.…

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rogue waves getting more extreme

The study revealed rogue waves are more likely to occur in the winter (Captain Roger Wilson/NOAA)Rogue waves are becoming more extreme but are occurring less often, according to research led by the University of Southampton.Waves are classed as rogue when they are more than twice the height of the average sea state around them.A team of engineers and oceanographers from the University of Southampton, together with researchers from The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) studied data between 1994-2016 from 15 buoys positioned along the US western seaboard, from Seattle to San Diego. It revealed that on average, instances of rogue waves fell slightly over the 20 years, but the wave’s size, relative to the background sea, increased by 1% year on year.The data also showed that rogue waves are more severe…

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solent landmark faces demolition

A glass tower could replace the chimney (Richard Donovan / Alamy Stock Photo)The iconic chimney at Fawley Power Station at the entrance to Southampton Waters could be demolished as part of an £800 million residential development on the site.Built in 1964, sailors have long used the chimney as a landmark for navigating the Solent. Developer Fawley Waterside Ltd said it understood the importance of the structure for skippers, and plans to seek permission to build a 100-metre glass tower in its place. It also wants approval to build 1,500 houses on the 3,000 acre site, along with a hotel, yacht clubs, shops and a marina.…

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