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Bake from ScratchBake from Scratch

Bake from Scratch March/April 2019

Bake from Scratch is a celebration of all things baking. A seasonal publication from Hoffman Media, this magazine is brimming with stunning photography, easy-to-follow recipes, techniques for creating beautiful, artisan baked goods, and endless inspiration for home bakers.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hoffman Media
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
from the editor

AT LAST, WE RETURN TO THE EPICENTER OF BAKING: FRANCE. My love for France—the pastries, the breads, the culture—goes back almost as far as my love for baking. The Bake from Scratch team has been there many times over, constantly mining the land of pâtisserie for sweet inspiration. This well never runs dry, so here we are again for a deeper dive into cake, custard, and crème. This issue is stacked with both classic and revamped recipes signature to the French. We have the Parisian Flan, a custard creation that checks all the boxes on texture, taste, and sheer beauty. Then we’re focusing on France’s top cultured cream and one of my favorite ingredients to bake with: crème fraîche. We put fraîche spins on pain de mie, pound cake, and butter-rich…

access_time1 min.
trending tomes

These recent cookbooks are incredible references for all things French baking. For more classic French cookbooks every home baker should have on their shelf, flip to page 107. Let’s Eat France (Artisan, 2018) by François-Régis Gaudry This book is an all-encompassing encyclopedia of French cuisine and food culture, with traditional recipes and historical anecdotes accompanied by stunning photography and illustrations. Bake Like a French Pastry Chef (Countryman Press, 2018) by Michel de Rovira and Augustin Paluel-Marmont The authors, cofounders of the Paris-based cookie company Michel et Augustin, created this book to help students pass the French pastry chef certificate. It’s incredibly instructive, offering incisive tips and tutorials that make pâtisserie accessible to everyone.…

access_time3 min.
what to do

DINE La Jacobine 6th arrondissement 59-61 rue Saint-André des Arts, 75006 I always stop by this retro bistro tucked away in an arcade near Odeon for spicy tajine and their family-style desserts. Mokonuts 11th arrondissement 5 rue Saint-Bernard, 75011 Mokonuts is one of Paris’s hidden gems, serving up lunch with Middle Eastern flair and the city’s best cookies. Buvette 9th arrondissement 28 rue Henry Monnier, 75009 Instagram-famous for their cozy street-side tables, this bistro has a delicious tarte Tatin that I never miss. Le Trumilou 4th arrondissement 84 quai de l’Hôtel de Ville, 75004 This restaurant in the trendy Marais neighborhood serves up the best steak au poivre and tarte au citron around. STROLL AND SHOP Île Saint-Louis 4th arrondissement I love meandering down the streets of the Île Saint-Louis, one of two natural islands in the Seine River, window-shopping with a crêpe in hand. Outdoor…

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contributors

FIRST TIME EATING PÂTISSERIE? “I ordered Pierre Hermé’s mille-feuille on a Parisian pastry tour. When I took my first bite, I shed a tear! I’d never tasted something so complex. ” Joann Pai Food and travel photographer Paris, France GO-TO FRENCH RECIPE TO BAKE AT HOME? “I love the simplicity of madeleines. They’re lovely with a cup of tea and can be infused with anything. Right now, I’m keen on matcha madeleines. ” Frank Barron Food writer and founder of Cake Boy Paris blog Paris, France FIRST TIME EATING PÂTISSERIE? “Twelve years ago, I tried my first éclair. This was before less-sweet pastry was trendy, so it was incredibly sweet. It was a downright revelation! ” Lindsey Tramuta Writer and author of The New Paris (Harry N. Abrams, 2017) Paris, France GO-TO FRENCH RECIPE TO BAKE AT HOME? “I bake…

access_time2 min.
glossary

BAIN-MARIE (bah-MAH-ree): A cooking technique similar to a double boiler where a pan is placed over a hot water bath to gently heat delicate dishes like soufflés BOULANGERIE (boo-LANzhree): A bakery that specializes in the art of making bread BROCANTE (broh-KAHNT): An outdoor flea market where antiques, art, jewelry, and other secondhand items can be purchased CANELÉ (kan-lay): Rum-flavored pastry with a caramelized crust and a soft, custard interior; baked in special canelés molds CLAFOUTIS (klah-foo-TEE): A dessert made of fruit (traditionally, unpitted cherries) and baked in a sweet custard CRÈME CARAMEL (krehm-KAIR-ah-mel): A freestanding custard dessert served with a caramel sauce CRÈME MOUSSELINE (krehmmoose-leen): A light cream made by combining pastry cream and butter, used as a filling in Paris-Brests and other delicate pastries CRÈME PATISSIÈRE (krehmpa-TEES-ee-air): A thick and rich vanilla custard used as a…

access_time3 min.
chocolate pear clafoutis

In France, when a dish is described as à l’ancienne (old fashioned manner), you know it’s going to be good. A dessert made à l’ancienne is traditional, simple, and maybe even a little rustic. Above all, it is dignified. Often using only a handful of high-quality ingredients and a decades-old method, these recipes are handed down through generations to stand the test of time. My mamie’s cherry clafoutis is made à l’ancienne. I grew up in Paris, France. Every Sunday, my family and I would have lunch at my grandparents’ house in Antony, a suburb just south of Paris. Their house had colorful stained glass windows facing the street, and tufts of lavender framed the front walkway. The neighbors’ cherry tree towered over the house from an adjoining garden. During springtime,…

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