IndigoBlue Magazine December 2021

IndigoBlue Magazine offers content on health, wellness, and personal growth & development from authors sharing their personal perspectives and expertise. Since so many of us are feeling disconnected, the magazine offers an opportunity to feel more connected by seeing our experience through the experience of others. Learn tips and solutions to support your health, mental health, and overall well-being.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Imagine Communications, LLC.
Frequency:
Monthly
$4.99
$19.99
12 Issues

in this issue

1 min
editor’s note–december 2021 issue

Entering a new season, we see a lot of change and volatility with the job market. Reflection, movement, growth, opportunities, and time to take note of what really matters—and the changes do not seem to be slowing down. In this issue, we learn more about preventing burnout, taking time to breathe—really breathe—and showing our love for ourselves and others through quiet reflection and really listening. What do we want to achieve? What really matters to us most now? How can we keep our personal certainty intact with so much change? And how do we value others as much as we value ourselves? Our authors share their experiences and triumphs to help us making positive shifts in our lives. We hope you find the tips and solutions you need to improve your…

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6 min
nourishing relationships with the gift of active listening

As night falls this evening in the 5 o’clock hour, I am struck by the incongruency between nature and society during this time of year. A whirlwind of advertisements and festivities attempt to sweep me up into a frenzy of over-extension fueled by not just the promise of good times and good cheer, but also a sense of urgency, consumerism, and obligation. Yet all around me are signs of late autumn’s descent into simplicity, its shedding down to the bare essentials in preparation for the stillness of winter. In elongated darkness, as Nature quiets and stills herself, she beckons me to follow suit. I am called to adjust my pace in ways that expend less energy “out there” and gather it close to home and hearth. I honor stillness and generate…

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4 min
to prevent burnout, entrepreneurs should set limits on their growth

During the height of my burnout, my sister told me she was getting married in Fiji. She gave me five months notice before the wedding and, of course, I said I’d be there. At the time, my business’s sales process included complicated online launches and live events. For these, I required great Wifi and high energy. Each launch was totally unique. In the month leading up to the wedding, I realized that I hadn‘t mapped out the time to actually make it. I had three live launches planned and I was contractually obligated to do speaking gigs. I was so busy (and burned out), that I hadn‘t noticed I had double booked myself. I called my sister to tell her the news. “I get it. Business comes first,” she responded. This broke…

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4 min
getting strategic about defense mechanisms

One of the legacies of psychoanalysis is the concept of Defense Mechanisms, which are psychological strategies that human beings use in order to cope with stressful and unpleasant situations, events, and feelings. They ‘protect’ our ego and our self-esteem in the face of uncertainties. Originally proposed by Sigmund Freud, and later propagated by his daughter, Anna Freud, defense mechanisms have been an integral part of psychological literature. Other psychologists have added to the list and enhanced our understanding of how they work. Defense mechanisms work at a subconscious level so we may not immediately recognize them in operation. For example, when a life-situation gets absolutely out of control, we may ‘block’ out the situation, refusing to see the reality. This is called denial, a common defense mechanism. A spouse may refuse to…

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4 min
growing older with joy

Could growing older actually be a joyful experience? The idea that wrinkles and grey hair are positive may seem strange, but perhaps we could learn from other cultures about seeing ageing in a more positive light. In Western culture, youth sells. Perfect, smooth, flawless skin. Cookie cutter concepts of beauty. Our capitalist society’s emphasis on the positive qualities of the young can create ageist attitudes. As we start to lose our youthful looks, sadness and anxiety can set in. We may want to dye our hair or find the latest miracle cream. Yet if we spend our later days clinging on to what remains of our youthful appearance, we may miss out on what ageing is really about. In Native American culture, elders are prized for their knowledge and experience. They are…

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5 min
getting crystal clear on your next career move with the ‘3 cs’

For 28 years, I worked in corporate America. My day started at 5 a.m., and I tried to squeeze in a workout before starting the workday. After a quick shower, I’d end up on an hour-long work call before the clock had even struck 7. Between getting dressed and commuting in New York traffic, I was lucky if I made it to work before 9. Most days were filled with back-to-back meetings. I often had to decide which meeting I would leave early just so that I could use the restroom. Work finished at 6 or 7 p.m. and — more often than not — I’d have a client dinner to attend after work. This all changed in 2001 when I had a traumatic brain injury. While I pushed through many of my…

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