American Society of Landscape Architects

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Landscape Architecture MagazineLandscape Architecture Magazine

Landscape Architecture Magazine October 2018

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Society of Landscape Architects
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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contributors

KOFI BOONE, ASLA, (“Many Stories Matter,” page 210) is an associate professor of landscape architecture at North Carolina State University’s College of Design. You can reach him on Twitter @KBbop.“In my book review, I left out references to the International Federation of Landscape Architects and its attempts to establish academic and professional support for the development of landscape architecture on the continent of Africa. There are a number of academic programs already, but more could be done to expose current work within the profession.”LESLEY PEREZ, ASSOCIATE ASLA, (“Step by Step by Step,” page 102) grew up in Florida, spent more than a decade in London, and now works as a landscape designer in Brooklyn. You can find her on Instagram @lesley_ _maria.“I learned so much fascinating trivia about Pittsburgh’s many…

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make yourself known

One welcome development these days is that landscape architecture is very much in the news, and in an invariably positive light. But landscape architects are not necessarily in there, at least not as such. There have been some excellent opportunities lately to insert the words “landscape architect” in a major news outlet, conjoined to a living person practicing the art, but they were missed. These oversights have caused frustration and upset among landscape architects on the chatwaves. The upset is understandable. Consider the frustration a motivator.The New York Times has led the way lately in misapprehending landscape architects and their roles. In early August, the paper ran a fun, generous photo essay about the rehabilitation of the Chicago River. It focused on the Chicago Riverwalk, that glorious new promenade that…

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letters

HOW GRATING"Guardians of the Soil” (July) mis-the well-crafted study “Ginterprets by Patricia Culligan and uses that twisted logic to build a case that tree grates are a good thing. Installing a tree that can reliably become a mature specimen in a dense urban space is a complex process with approximately six critical requirements, any one of which, if ignored, will cause stress, decline, and even premature loss of the tree. The list includes (1) adequate volumes of quality soil, (2) respecting the long-term growth of the tree’s critical trunk flare and main support roots, (3) infiltrating adequate water into the soil, (4) removing excess water from the soil, (5) spacing for mature growth, and (6) quality nursery with good branching structure and radial roots high in the root ball. Landscape…

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thicket of the mind

Phoebe Lickwar, ASLA, and Matt Donham constructed their garden in five days. The wood beams were charred using the Japanese method of shou sugi ban. (ANDERSEN WOOF)When Phoebe Lickwar, ASLA, and Matt Donham arrived in a small town in central France this past March, everyone knew who they were. The designers, principals at FORGE Landscape Architecture and RAFT Landscape Architecture, respectively, were one of some 24 teams (and the only Americans) competing in this year’s Domaine Chaumont-sur-Loire International Garden Festival. And as they walked around, Donham remembers, “every person was like, ‘Ohhhh, the Americans with the 400 trees.’ Even the guy who took our tickets in the chateau was like, ‘Oh, you’re the ones with the 400 trees.’”The festival’s theme was “Garden of Thoughts,” and Lickwar’s and Donham’s concept, Dans…

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on ramp

Nicole Plunkett, ASLA, at a Future Landscape Architects of America event at Littlewood Elementary School in Gainesville, Florida. (ANDREW CASTANHEIRA/FLAA) Pouring water onto a piece of sod and watching it percolate through the soil. Designing a botanical garden. Developing a project budget. These are just some of the activities included in the winning lesson plans selected as part of the inaugural Curriculum Challenge of the Future Landscape Architects of America (FLAA). The winners, which will be available for download from FLAA’s website later this month, include Rebecca Bradley, ASLA; Kristin Kildall, ASLA; Dana Hernalsteen, Associate ASLA; Julian Sabin; Michael Gilkey Jr., ASLA; Laura Gilkey; and Gavin Cain, ASLA.The competition was devised by FLAA founder Nicole Plunkett, ASLA, and curriculum chair Erin Porter as a way to spur the creation of…

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shapes of water

Islands tapered with the direction of incoming water (left) better distribute flow than those tapered in the opposite direction (right).CNC-milled topographies are hydraulically tested in the Nepf Environmental Fluid Mechanics Lab at MIT.Arigorously tested set of new guide-A lines is taking aim at the over-prevalence of plain stormwater basins in our urban landscapes. The result of more than two years of research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Design Guidelines for Urban Stormwater Wetlands lays out a strategy intended to make the design of rich, multifunctional wetlands a much more accessible process for municipalities, public works departments, and the engineers and landscape architects with whom they collaborate.The interdisciplinary team behind the guidelines hopes they “offer a different vision to what is commonly built,” says Celina Balderas Guzman, the lead author…

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