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Outdoor LifeOutdoor Life

Outdoor Life February/March 2018

Our readers' hands-on spirit is reflected in the magazine's comprehensive gear tests and personal adventure stories. Whether shopping for a new rifle, searching for the hottest fishing holes this weekend or thirsting for exciting adventure tales, Outdoor Life is the ultimate resource.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
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9 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
the life

South Kingstown, RIFeb.25/11:47 a.m.After taking his son bowhunting, Jason McKeen realized a blind wasn’t going to get his restless 5-year-old hooked. So he tried another tactic: tromping through the woods behind a buddy’s beagle. When McKeen shot a coontail, Owen insisted on carrying it in his vest. A few minutes later, he slipped the rabbit out to study it. But once they added two more to the pouch, curiosity turned to weariness. “It’s starting to get heavy, Dad,” he said. “You’ve got to take them back. ■…

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letters

PINE DINING▸ Thanks for bringing back old memories with “OL Family Recipes” (From the Archives, The Life, November). I come from a family of seven kids, and there wasn’t always a lot to eat. Fish, wild game, and the garden provided much of our food in the ’50s and ’60s. I guess the only thing I didn’t really appreciate was porcupine. I thought the “pine” referred to the taste of the meat.I also enjoyed “Lost & Found.” The Christmas flood of 1964 on the Rogue River here in Grants Pass brought many folks to the riverbank to watch (if they could find a safe place to stand). I watched with my brothers as trees and whole houses floated by, still decorated for Christmas. Those homes that didn’t survive intact gave…

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hunter education

I cannot imagine a world without hunters. I can’t bear to think of life without the thrill of the chase, our deep communion with wild animals, and the selfimposed difficulty that defines a hard hunt. And I certainly don’t want to live in a world without backstraps.But we are closer to a world without hunters than we’ve been since World War II, and it’s not just because anti-hunters have passed restrictive legislation, or because we’ve lost habitat for wildlife. It’s because we are old, and getting older. And because we’ve done a lousy job of finding people to replace us.That’s the context for this issue’s cover stories, which are indispensable reading if you care about perpetuating our hunting traditions. “The Boomer Bomb” (p. 42) defines the problem, but any demographer…

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the end is nigh …again

We’ve warned our readers about the end of hunting (see “The License Cliff,” p. 42) a hundred times in the past 120 years. But we weren’t just crying wolf: Hunting has faced many legitimate threats over the decades, which have ranged from tooliberal regulations and poor resource management to habitat loss and antihunting activism. But we reported on those issues to help raise awareness and troubleshoot our thorniest problems— like advocating for a reduction in daily duck bag limits in the ’20s and ’30s. And in most cases, the outcome wasn’t so grim after all. Here’s a look back at some of the gravest pronouncements from the pages of Outdoor Life.JANUARY 1921“THE FUTURE OF AMERICAN GAME”The decline in the amount of game in America gives us a gloomy prospect for…

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zinke’s world view

(CHRIS SORENSEN)“IT’S MY VIEW THAT SOME MONUMENTS HAVE BEEN PUT IN PLACE TO PREVENT USE, RATHER THAN TO PROTECT OBJECTS.”ON NATIONAL MONUMENTSOur interview with Ryan Zinke was held just weeks before President Trump announced that he would significantly reduce the size of two national monuments in Utah.“The President was right to request a review of monuments. People need to read the Antiquities Act. Congress delegates certain powers to the president to be protected under the Act. But fundamentally, the items protected have to have an objective, to protect a historic, cultural, or scientific value. The Act clearly establishes that monuments are to be the ‘smallest area compatible with proper care and management of the objects to be protected.’“My main concern with monuments is to make sure public access is protected,…

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bad news in the bayou

WAYNE LUXICH II, PICAYUNE, MSIF WE USE YOUR STORY, WE’LL SEND YOU THIS BOOK!”THIS HAPPENED TO ME” HAS BEEN A FIXTURE OF OUTDOOR LIFE SINCE IT FIRST APPEARED IN 1940. WE’VE SINCE COMPILED SOME OF THE MOST HARROWING, HAIR-RAISING MISADVENTURES READERS HAVE EVER EXPERIENCED IN A SINGLE VOLUME. IF WE RUN YOUR STORY, YOU CAN PORE OVER THE 183 PAGES OF THIS ACTION-PACKED BOOK KNOWING YOU’RE IN GOOD COMPANY. WANT TO BUY A COPY INSTEAD? THEY’RE AVAILABLE AT OUTDOORLIFE.COM/THTMBOOKSTORYTIMEWe publish true adventures. Only those used will be acknowledged. Send to thtm@OutdoorLife.com (preferred), or Outdoor Life, THTM, 2 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016. Include a daytime phone number. ■…

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