Active Interest Media

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Active Interest Media

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category_outlined / Boating & Aviation
PassageMakerPassageMaker

PassageMaker

January - February 2019

PassageMaker Magazine (PMM) is the market leader covering the boats, people, gear, and destinations for the trawler and cruising-under-power lifestyle. Over the years it has evolved to connect the marine industry to consumers through print, digital, online, and in-person brands (Trawler Fest, Trawler Fest University, and Trawler Port)

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Active Interest Media
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8 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
au revoir, murf.

“Big” Murf in the fog off Blake Island, Washington. (Lynn Cooper)The very next day after my parents closed on their first fiberglass sailboat, a Ranger 23, I caught my dad perusing the classifieds in our local sailing rag, 48° North. I was 11 years old and pleased they had replaced the rusting steel boat that sat on a cradle in our front yard with something that actually floated. But it was clear I should not get too attached to this new boat. I got the feeling over breakfast that morning that our new family member was just a temporary fix for these serial-boat-owner parents of mine. They had already sailed and sold a 19-foot Mercury, a Thunderbird, and the aforementioned rust bucket.The new one, dubbed Murf, would eventually become known…

access_time8 min.
news & notes

BOAT NAME CONTEST WINNERSThe time to announce the winner of our 2018 Boat Name Contest has arrived. While it was a close race between our first and second place winners, a clear winner has emerged. With a final tally of 2,822 votes, Heartbeat, an American Tug 34, clearly won over voters’ hearts to earn first place. It was a close competition, though, as second-place finisher 5 to 1 earned a solid 2,311 votes. A bit further back in the vote count, a Grand Banks 46, Dessert First, took third place with 650 votes.We had a lot of fun seeing all the entries and appreciate all our readers who submitted boat names and voted in this contest. And many thanks to mazu, Fusion, and Icom for supporting the contest by providing…

access_time10 min.
how long will my engine last?

At our diesel engine classes at TrawlerFest, the question of engine longevity always comes up. This question also plays a key part in most conversations about buying a used boat. And while there is never a definitive answer, there are several factors that contribute to how long an engine runs and several things you can do to prolong the life of your engine.Engine life can be defined as “time between overhaul” (TBO). Every engine manufacturer calculates a designed engine life, but only sometimes is this information available to the public. The life of an engine can be projected in three ways: gallons of fuel burned, hours operated, or years of operation. A given engine, for example, might be expected to run for 50,000 gallons of fuel, 10,000 hours, or 20…

access_time2 min.
humphree interceptor and fin stabilization

As our own Steve Zimmerman wrote about recently (“Troubleshooter: Stability Concerns,” September 2018), vessel stabilization has gone through a renaissance of late. Stabilization—now considered an absolute must-have by many cruisers—has become an increasingly competitive market. With a host of new products released in both the gyro and fin marketplaces, stabilization options are becoming more accessible as the industry moves out of the exclusive domain of the superyacht and into the mainstream.One of the manufacturers leading the charge is Humphree, a Swedish company that has been working on its trim systems for years. Recently in Fort Lauderdale we had the chance to see a demo of the Humphree system, which features automated electric trim tabs called Interceptors. Interceptors work well at higher speeds, as the transom-mounted plates automatically and quickly—within 0.7…

access_time6 min.
winegard wifi extender

Panbo.comWhen I first wrote about my installation of a Winegard ConnecT, it was because I was frustrated by the cabling and mounting scheme Winegard employs. But the company deserves high marks for their response to my concerns, as they quickly had a proposed solution, which I will explain below. While ConnecT’s all-in-one WiFi and cellular get-online system—with the cell service included—is Winegard’s first entry into the marine market, they’ve been at it in the recreational vehicle world for quite some time. And their radio frequency (RF) performance is rock solid, even if the interface seemed rather bare-bones to me.The Winegard ConnecT 4G1xM is a WiFi bridge, 4G/LTE modem, and router in a single enclosure. It provides the option to connect either via cellular bandwidth purchased directly from Winegard or via…

access_time6 min.
time and tide, part one

Let’s take a look at the physics behind our tides using an iron barbell to demonstrate some of the principles that affect them. The better we understand these concepts, the better chance we have of correctly estimating our local tides during a voyage, should we need to.Imagine, for a moment, that I have a barbell—two iron balls of equal mass held together by a steel bar. If I want to balance this barbell on a fulcrum, I have to place the fulcrum at the center of the mass between the two iron balls. Now, if I am able to throw this barbell so that it tumbles end over end, the point around which the balls will pivot is the same point on which I had positioned my fulcrum (Figure 1).…

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