CMG West, LLC

shopping_cart_outlined
category_outlined / Hunting & Fishing
RECOIL OFFGRIDRECOIL OFFGRID

RECOIL OFFGRID October/November 2017

RECOIL OFFGRID takes a fresh look at emergency-related scenarios from the URBAN/CITY dweller's point of view. We speak to experts about what to do to stay alive and how. Plus, we feature products, equipment, and supplies that all urbanites should use. Topics covered include survival gear, food preparation, and much more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
CMG West, LLC
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SUBSCRIBE
$19.99
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
software check

Soft_Light/istockphoto.com I recently crammed three work trips into five weeks. Flying for what felt like back-to-back-to-back vacations — but without the vacation part — reinforced something I already knew: When you’re traveling in caffeine-fueled zombie mode, you won’t be in familiar territory or have your favorite kit in your carry-on. All you’ll have is you and your perishable skills. Sure, some might say, “Why not jam a three-day pack with supplies and check it in as a second piece of luggage?” I could do that, but the point is you don’t solve a problem with hardware, you solve it with software. No amount of cool kit will get you out of a jam if you don’t have the skills or experience to use it. This concept was reaffirmed on each of my three…

access_time7 min.
gearup

1MAKE & MODEL Goal Zero Yeti 1400 Lithium DIMENSIONS 10.1 by 15.3 by 10.4 inches MSRP $2,000 URL www.goalzero.com NOTES Gasoline, propane, wood — all fuels that, in a long-term survival situation, will eventually be as scarce as honesty on a campaign trail. But there’s one resource that’ll never run out: sunlight. That’s why Goal Zero’s latest solar-powered portable power station is winning awards. The Yeti 1400 Lithium is essentially a giant 1425Wh battery that can power a fridge for a day, provide juice for a 12V LED for almost 20 days, or charge a smartphone 70 times. Once it’s depleted, the Yeti 1400 can be charged by a Boulder 100 Solar Panel (sold separately for $300) or by using AC power. In fact, you can charge via both means simultaneously. Plus, it has a user-friendly display with real-time usage…

access_time8 min.
beam-focusing flashlights

When it comes to flashlights, versatility is the name of the game. If you’re carrying a buttoncell keychain light, you can easily use it to search through your glovebox, but you can’t illuminate far-away objects. On the other hand, a heavy-duty spotlight excels at long range, but good luck trying to use it to read a map without blinding yourself. There are handheld lights that occupy various positions along this spectrum, but all are compromises — a concentrated spot beam for long-distance throw, a wide floodlight for up-close uses, or a blend of the two for intermediate ranges. This dilemma led to the development of beam-focusing flashlights, which feature a lens or reflector that moves independently from the light source to adjust the beam pattern. By pushing or twisting the bezel,…

access_time4 min.
what if?

You woke up slowly, grudgingly, and in a state of confusion. It was so cold, shockingly cold. As you lay there, curled up and shivering on the bench seat of the old pickup truck, with only your jacket for warmth, you couldn’t quite reconcile the facts. It wasn’t too long ago that you very nearly had a heat stroke. And just 10 hours later, you felt as though you were going to freeze to death. “How can all of that heat be gone?” you asked yourself, zipping your work jacket up to your chin and laying out spare clothing in your lap like a blanket. If only the truck would start, you lamented, wishing you could drive to safety (or at least run the heater for warmth). But the truck was…

access_time8 min.
cqc expert: jared wihongi’s approach

You have to be freaking kidding me! Seriously?” I muttered to myself. I was familiar enough with my truck to know that this was a serious issue and wouldn’t be a quick fix. Oh well, it was what it was, and whining wasn’t going to change anything. I needed to focus my energy on the situation at hand ... so what was my next step? It was 100 degrees outside and climbing. I needed to stay calm and figure this out, but time was of the essence. I did a quick survey of my surroundings and the horizon. I was fully aware I was lost even before my vehicle broke down. So, outside of dumb luck, there wasn’t a good chance I would find my way out on foot, especially considering…

access_time7 min.
survival expert: tim macwelch’s approach

Since I had no idea how long I would have to wait for another vehicle to appear, I decided to pass the time by sifting through my stash of supplies. There were so many things that I owned … that weren’t with me on this trip. But those possessions wouldn’t help me while they were sitting at home, so I decided to stop worrying about them. I focused on the supplies that would help right then. In the blinding sun, I made a mental list of the goods, and then put on my sunglasses to scan the horizon in every direction. No buildings, no towers, no sign of human existence were to be seen, other than myself, the road, and the broken-down truck. There was no point in trying to walk…

help