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Southern Cast IronSouthern Cast Iron

Southern Cast Iron May/June 2018

From skillet suppers to classic sides, Dutch oven dinners to mouthwatering pies, Southern Cast Iron delivers the beloved flavors of classic home cooking. Southern Cast Iron highlights unique collectibles, shares tips for caring for your favorite pans, and gives in-depth stories of collectors, chefs, and foundries. Take a look inside the world of cast-iron cooking and history. Beautifully photographed and printed on high-quality paper, it’s a magazine to share with friends and family, and return to each time you pull your favorite skillet out of the cupboard.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hoffman Media
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
celebrating the bounty of summer

Early summer in the South is nothing short of pure delight. The days are longer, temperatures aren’t yet scorching, and the food—oh, the food. With a bounty of produce already bursting forth, it’s the best time of year to be a home cook.Ruby red tomatoes sit plump on the vine, golden ears of corn are turning sweet inside their tough husks, and berries grow ripe and juicy, all just waiting to be plucked and turned into the classic seasonal dishes we’ve been waiting for all winter. Whether you’re tending to your backyard garden or meandering through the stalls of your local farmers’ market, there’s an unmatched satisfaction in filling your basket with fresh ingredients—and the recipes in this issue provide plenty of inspiration to use up your hand-picked haul.This season…

access_time2 min.
up your potluck game with cast iron

1. Freeze a cast-iron skillet to use as a pie pan to keep your icebox pies colder longer.2. Turn up the heat and toss in fresh vegetables to get the perfect char.3. Hot sides like baked beans will keep their heat longer thanks to the thick walls of your cast-iron skillet.4. Look to your Dutch oven for can’t-beat braised barbecue. Cast iron’s even heat distribution lets meat cook low, slow, and steady.TASTES & TOOLSPRODUCT SPOTLIGHTTENNESSEE MOJO RUBCreated in the Volunteer State for competition cooking, this barbecue rub adds a smoky, sweet spice to everything from grilled chicken to a big bowl of popcorn. $9.97; tnmojobbq.comBLACK JACKET TACKLE COMPLETE HANDLE HOLDER SETWhether cooking over an open flame or pulling a hot skillet of cornbread from the oven, these handle holders are…

access_time2 min.
fluffy loaves

SANDWICH BREADMakes 2 (9x5-inch) loavesMaking your own bread turns everyday sandwiches into something special.1½ cups warm whole milk (105° to 110°), divided2¼ teaspoons active dry yeast⅓ cup sugar¼ cup plus 2 teaspoons unsalted butter, melted and divided2 large eggs1 tablespoon kosher salt5 to 6 cups all-purpose flourFIRST In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, stir together ¼ cup warm milk and yeast. Let stand until mixture is foamy, about 5 minutes.NEXT Add sugar, ¼ cup melted butter, eggs, salt, and remaining 1¼ cups warm milk, stirring to combine. With mixer on low speed, gradually add 5 cups flour, beating until smooth, about 2 minutes. Switch to the dough hook attachment. Beat until dough is stiff and slightly tacky, about 10 minutes, adding remaining 1 cup…

access_time5 min.
annie pettry decca

Long before Annie Pettry became one of Kentucky’s premiere chefs, she grew up playing in the gardens and fishing in the nearby ponds outside of her parents’ Asheville, North Carolina, home. “Both my mom and dad were great gardeners, so we grew a lot of our own vegetables,” she recalls. “And we would smoke the fish we caught from my mom’s trout pond.” Fresh produce and cast iron were often the key ingredients to supper at her family’s table—a skillet was always left ready and waiting on the stove, and a garden full of fresh vegetables dictated the flavors of the evening.“My mom’s signature dish around our house was Southwestern cornbread,” she says. “It was everyone’s favorite. It had onion, garlic, fresh corn, jalapeños, and grated Cheddar. And she would…

access_time3 min.
love music? you can thank louisiana

YOU’RE IN FOR A HAYRIDESHREVEPORT AND CENTRALAs the original country and western music legends were getting their start, Shreveport’s beautiful Municipal Auditorium was a must-play venue. Known for the Louisiana Hayride radio program, the building was frequented by the likes of Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley and Johnny Horton. For an intimate listening environment with contemporary singer-songwriters, music aficionados catch a show at the House Concert Series. And if Shreveport is known for its country and western music, Ferriday, Louisiana, on the Mississippi River is notable for its Delta blues, rockabilly and gospel heritage. A trip to its Delta Music Museum and Arcade Theater showcases the town’s musical heritage (which includes locals Jerry Lee Lewis, Mickey Gilley and Jimmy Swaggart—who also all happen to be cousins).DANCING IN THE STREETSGREATER NEW ORLEANSNew…

access_time2 min.
boiled, grilled & fried - louisiana loves shrimp

THE SECRET TO SUPERIOR SEAFOODNearly a third of the seafood landed in the U.S. comes from Louisiana. The state’s nutrient-rich estuaries, fed by the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, create an environment where delicious seafood thrives. These estuaries provide a delicate balance of fresh and saltwater, which forms an ideal habitat for microscopic organisms that make the base of the marine food chain. The Bayou State’s warm, fertile waters are particularly helpful to brown and white shrimp, so much so that Louisiana shrimpers land almost 50 percent of shrimp from the entire Gulf of Mexico (with an economic impact of $1.3 billion). For more information about Louisiana shrimp, visit LouisianaSeafood.com.NEARLY ONE-THIRD OF THE SEAFOOD LANDED IN THE U.S. COMES FROM LOUISIANA.SEAFOOD FESTIVALSNEW ORLEANS OYSTER FESTNEW ORLEANSJUNEARTS AND CRABS FESTLAKE CHARLESAUGUSTDELCAMBRE SHRIMP…

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