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Texas Highways MagazineTexas Highways Magazine

Texas Highways Magazine November 2016

Texas Highways, the official travel magazine of Texas, encourages recreational travel within Texas and tells the Texas story to readers around the world. Renowned for its photography, statewide events coverage, top weekend excursions, off-the-beaten path discoveries, and scenic destinations, Texas Highways helps readers discover the treasures of the Lone Star State.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Texas Department of Transportation
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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let’s celebrate!

SINCE 1977, TEXAS HIGHWAYS has been a member of the International Regional Magazine Association (IRMA for short)—a group of nearly 40 publications whose missions run the gamut from covering travel in Texas to delving into the culture of the Pacific Northwest. Each year, IRMA members meet to talk shop, share ideas, brainstorm solutions to common problems, and recognize our talented peers with awards focused on design, writing, and photography. And so, as we celebrate our 42nd year as the travel magazine of Texas, we’re bursting with pride: On September 19 at the 2016 IRMA conference in Fort Lauderdale, Texas Highways received a total of 21 awards, including our first-time win as “Magazine of the Year;” a Gold prize for companion website; well-deserved laurels for our in-house wordsmith Matt Joyce, who won…

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merge

GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? Congratulations to @TexasHighways for winning the International Regional Magazine Association’s 2016 Magazine of the Year award. #TexasPride JAMES BASS, @TXDOTCEO OUR FAVORITE SOCIAL MEDIA OF THE MONTH I love beautiful McKittrick Canyon & the Pratt house [October]! Wallace Pratt was my great uncle, so I am a little biased though. LYNNE DREWRY DAUGHTERS, WACO @TexasHighways True Texan quiz reminds me of a joke: A fella stops at the Dairy Queen in Mexia and asks, “How do you pronounce this place?” “Day-ree Qweeeen.”CHERIE COLBURN, @cheriecolburn Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram True Texans A couple of years ago, my husband and I were on our way to a family outing on the Frio River. We were traveling south on US 83 and lost the tread on one of our rear tires. We limped to…

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scenic route

Ode to England 31º 53' 30.89" N 102º 19' 34.62" W TWO OF ODESSA’S most unusual attractions are reproductions of iconic British sites. Stonehenge, on the northeast corner of the University of Texas Permian Basin campus, is nearly the same size as the one in England. Made of local limestone, it provides a peaceful place of reflection and contemplation. About three miles west of the university, the Globe Theatre at Odessa College is modeled after William Shakespeare’s original theater in London. It hosts Shakespearean plays, as well as Broadway musicals and other performances. odessacvb.com/visit/attractions/unique-attractions…

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power up!

The museum’s tribute to all things gaming is sure to delight the buttonmashing kid inside. ONCE A RURAL SUBURB 30 MILES north of Dallas, Frisco is now a burgeoning mini-city of its own. As the home of the Double-A Frisco Roughriders baseball team, FC Dallas of Major League Soccer, the NBA D-League Texas Legends, and the Dallas Cowboys’ new headquarters and practice facility, Frisco always has a game going on, it seems. Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that Frisco is also home to a new destination dedicated to another favorite competitive pastime—video games. Nestled within the Frisco Discovery Center, a complex of arts, science, and cultural exhibits, the National Videogame Museum opened in April to the delight of gamers everywhere. Whether you were a Pac-Man expert in the ’70s, a Nintendo kid…

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brushing up on history

WITHIN A FEW MINUTES’ WALK OF DOWNtown Austin’s bustling Sixth Street entertainment district and historic Congress Avenue, a trio of museums at the city’s Brush Square offer distinctive windows into the Texas capital’s past. Visiting all three in one day, perhaps with a lunch break nearby at the Chez Nous French bistro or Carmelo’s Italian Restaurant—the latter housed in the historic Old Depot Hotel—makes for a wellrounded history lesson that touches on the Texas Revolution, American literature, and the story of Austin firefighting. A trio of museums at Austin’s Brush Square offer distinctive windows into the city’s past. When Republic of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar appointed his old friend Edwin Waller, a veteran of the Texas War of Independence and a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, to plat the…

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walking to the water

MY FRIEND CALLIE AND I HAD BEEN HEARING about Gorman Falls—the 70-foot waterfall that’s the centerpiece of Colorado Bend State Park— for the past few years. So when we wrapped up a weekend getaway to San Saba this past spring, we followed our whims and detoured to the park before the 100-mile drive back to our homes in Austin. Our goal: to hike to the bottom of the waterfall. Were we in Central Texas, or had we suddenly walked straight into Puerto Rico? While park rangers lead regular tours to the falls, we opted to tackle the three-mile, round-trip hike without a guide. At first, we questioned the wisdom of our decision; even though the map assured us we were headed in the right direction, nothing about the trail indicated that we…

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