Aqualuna Media and Creative Pty

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White HorsesWhite Horses

White Horses

Issue # 30 Spring 2019

White Horses is an original and authentic quarterly publication about the surf, ocean, creativity and adventure, and delivers a worthy and highly acclaimed alternative to existing surf mags. If you get equally, if not more excited by the glimpse of a clean, empty beach-break peak through some foreshore trees, than you do witnessing a million air reverses on a comp webcast, then there's every chance White Horses is for you.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Aqualuna Media and Creative Pty
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
white horses

PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ARTISTS HORSIES ISSUE THREE - OH GARY PARKER | MIKE COOTS | RYAN MILLER STU GIBSON | DOMINIC MOSQUEIRA | ALAN VAN GYSEN ARLENE BAX | JOE TERMINI | TONY HEFF | JOHN OGDEN | BRUCE USHER GRANT SCHOLTZ | BOSKO | NATALIE GRONO | SEAN DAVEY | MARCUS PALADINO | BRAD MASTERS | STEVE SHERMAN AL MACKINNON | JACK BARRIPP | JOEL NANKIVELL SEAN SCOTT | NATHAN OLDFIELD | PHIL THURSTON | DALE REUBEN | HUW MORRIS | NICK NAIRN-SMITH | LOGAN MURRAY PETER JOVIC |AMBER JONES | RILEY ELLIOTT | WARREN KEELAN TOM PEARSALL | KIM MCKENZIE | JAMIE BRISICK WRITERS AND STORYTELLERS HORSIES ISSUE THREE – OH TONY MONIZ | BRUCE USHER | PETER OBERTS | COL CHEADLE ASHLEY CHEADLE | ISAAC FEBRUARY | ALEX FLORENCE | MIKE CROSS JOCK SUTHERLAND |…

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the intro

We hope you’ll forgive us for co-opting the term Ohana to theme this magazine you hold in your hands. The concept is rooted firmly in Hawaiian culture, of course, but there is no better word to encompass the idea behind this special issue on family. Ohana, as we understand it, is not just your immediate family, but a greater connection to friends, community and ancestry. It’s a sense of belonging, celebrated through a shared connection to our environment. That being said, there was some frustration and compromise involved in putting this issue together. Not all the different pieces wanted to fit. The pages hold sorrow and tragedy too, but, for the most part, are infused with joy and a sense of purpose. A bit like family itself, you could say. On that…

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the moniz's

My mum is from Molokai. Her parents, my kahunas, were fishermen. My uncles, aunties and other elders on Molokai were farmers. Dad grew up on Oahu, he’s half Hawaiian and half Portuguese, and there’s a little bit of English blood in there somewhere too. He was more of a cowboy, rancher and a motorcycle guy. Mum got sent to high school here in Oahu and she stayed on, making Honolulu her home. I grew up on the South shore at Kalihi and Dad taught me to ride dirt bikes and threw me on horses when I was young. My uncle was the big influence when it came to surfing. Dad took me to the mountains; my uncle took me to the ocean. It was the best of both worlds. I learnt to…

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the roberts

My great grandfather moved to Palm Beach, New South Wales, in 1911, shortly after the area was settled. We’re the fourth generation of Roberts’ to live in this area. The original family home was destroyed by fire in the 1980s, but we’re now lucky to call Avalon home. I was at the beach before I could walk and started Nippers at Whale Beach with Barton Lynch when I was five years old. My first surfboard was given to me when I was 10, made by my cousin Timmy Rodgers, who learnt how to shape boards under the tutelage of Midget Farrelly. I started surfing Little Avalon in 1970 when I was 12 and still surf it to this day, 48 years later. Growing up in a surf town forges a common bond…

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the cheadles

I moved to Culburra Beach from the western suburbs of Sydney with my parents when I was 11 and that’s when I started to surf. I’m 60 now. I started a plumbing apprenticeship and then married my wife Kerry, who now works at the Aboriginal Health Services at South Nowra. Plumbing is a prick of a game, you’re in the trenches and no one appreciates you, and they all think you’re earning a fortune. So there was an almost surf shop for sale; it only had a few surf brands. We bought it in 1997 when my son Josh was three and we kept if for 13 years. It was hard work to build it up–seven days a week–and we took nothing out of it, but it supported our family and…

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the februarys

I grew up on a farm on the outskirts of Cape Town, in the middle of agriculture and wine country. My dad was a vegetable farmer and my mum was a nurse. Everybody in our community played rugby. I was always terrible at it. In my teen years we moved to Kuilsriver, closer to the city, where everyone played soccer. I was terrible at that, too! Then, when I was about 16, I made friends with a skateboarder. He worked at a surf shop in the city and it was there that my interest in surfing began. Hanging out at the shop we’d go through old magazines and we’d see those pictures of Tahiti with the perfect line-up and the boats in the water. I’d never ridden a wave before but…

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