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Racecar EngineeringRacecar Engineering

Racecar Engineering

December 2019

Racecar Engineering is the world’s leading technology publication for the motorsport industry. From aerodynamics to engines and from handling theory to manufacturing practice, Racecar Engineering is read by motorsport’s top professionals. Only Racecar Engineering brings this insight every month.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time5 min.
tour of duty

One of my previous columns (April, V29N4) was about the fact that come hell or high water the cars and kit always arrive at the track, and I hinted that there were many more stories to be told. So here we go again with a story from the start of the 1972 racing season that even after all these years stands out in the memory. I had moved up to Formula 2 with a team for both Emerson and Wilson Fittipaldi and we had sourced our pristine white-painted Bedford Duple transporter from one B Ecclestone, who had a car dealership in London and was also then the new Brabham team owner. The Duple had been the Brabham F1 transporter and was a converted bus fitted with luxurious reclining aircraft seats in…

access_time5 min.
rough justice

Since the last grand prix, a multitude of engineers have been working ceaselessly on analysing your chassis and PU performance, seeing how any possible improvements can be incorporated, taking into account the peculiarities of the circuit to be raced on this weekend. Constant simulation, including by reserve drivers back at base, has arrived at what seems to be the best combination of power modes, suspension and aero settings to start free practice. Throughout these sessions the set-up has been continuously honed to follow the changing weather and track conditions, to bring you the confidence in handling and balance that you need in order to commit fully to braking and corner entry speed. Practice times are middling; but after big efforts in qualifying you scrape into 10th with a good opportunity…

access_time15 min.
genetically modified

‘It’s a design change and there are pretty much zero carry-over parts compared to the C7.R’ One unbroken feature of the last 20 years at Le Mans has been GM’s Corvette racecars, competing in the GTE Pro category. It’s the longest uninterrupted run of appearances by a manufacturer team in the history of the event, and in October the company started the next phase of this long chapter in endurance racing with the unveiling of its new C8.R GTE/GTLM car. Since the Chevrolet Corvettes first rolled down pit road at the circuit de la Sarthe in 2000 there has been a close relationship between the road and race departments. Lessons learnt from the C5R were translated into the C6 that was produced for the road, and the learnings from that were put…

access_time8 min.
superpower

‘We believe for certain that this is a big step towards the globalisation of GT competition by GTA and ITR’ Just like the coming together of tectonic plates, the merging of the German DTM and Japanese GT500 series has taken a very long time, but finally they featured on track together at the last round of the DTM at Hockenheim in October. For the first time the six manufacturers ran together in competition, in qualifying and in the second race of the weekend. It was not necessarily a fair fight, the Japanese had brought their old cars to compete against the latest models from the DTM, and the lap times and race results showed a comprehensive win for the Europeans on home soil. At the time of writing BMW, Audi and Aston Martin…

access_time15 min.
desert storm

‘When we introduced the Maverick X3 we completely revolutionised the side-by-side sport category’ When a class for UTVs (utility task vehicles) was added to Dakar competition in 2017, few would have envisaged that a single vehicle would become dominant in just a couple of years – especially one that was not then even on the entry list. But then Bombardier Recreational Products (BRP) entered the fray with the Can-Am Maverick X3 x RS in 2018, and this changed everything. While the field was only slightly up to 11 – from eight in 2017 when it comprised a mix of Yamaha and Polaris UTVs – the bar had been raised substantially, as success was immediate for the North American brand, with Reinaldo Varela taking victory in the Can-Am machine on its debut. The 2019…

access_time1 min.
tech spec: can-am maverick x3 x rs

Chassis / roll cage Chrome moly cage structure formed from 4130 alloy: roof fitted over cage; heavy duty skid plate. Engine Rotax ACE (Advanced Combustion Efficiency) 900cc Triple-cylinder turbocharged engine (172bhp), liquid cooled with integrated intercooler and Donaldson high-performance air filter; Intelligent Throttle Control (ITC); electronic fuel injection. Transmission Quick Response System X (QRS-X) CVT; Smart-Lok variable locking differential with electronic controls. Suspension Front: Trophy truck inspired double A-arm with sway bar. Rear: 4-link torsional trailing-arm X (TTX) with sway bar; 24in travel (regulated to 20-inch travel for Dakar). Reiger and King dampers used on Dakar. Steering Tri-Mode Dynamic Power Steering (DPS). Brakes Dual 262mm ventilated disc brakes with hydraulic twin-piston calipers on the front and dual 248mm ventilated disc brakes with hydraulic twin-piston calipers on the rear. Wheels KMC 14in (35.6cm) aluminium bead-lock. Tyres Brand is optional Front: 30 x 10 x 14in. (76.2…

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