EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Tech & Gaming
Raspberry Pi for Beginners

Raspberry Pi for Beginners

8th Edition

Since 2012, the Raspberry Pi has revolutionised home computing around the world, providing people with a portable, affordable and incredibly versatile piece of tech to do with as they see fit. Now available in a variety of flavours, from the tiny Pi Zero to the powerful Pi 3 Model B, the mini computer’s popularity shows no signs of slowing. For those looking to try their hand at coding and custom computing for the first time, Raspberry Pi for Beginners will help you select the ideal model for your needs, set up your new device and take your first steps in this exciting new world. Once you have mastered the basics, we even provide plenty of fun projects to sink your teeth into, as well as offering guidance on Python and Scratch programming. With guides suitable for adults and children alike, read on to join the Raspberry Pi community today! Featuring: The basics - Select the right model for you, navigate your new gadget and install the latest OSs. Projects - Make the most of your Raspberry Pi and put your skills into practice with practical projects. Programming - Master the basics of Scratch and Python by learning the jargon and building sample games. Troubleshooting, FAQs & glossary - Fix common problems for hardware and software, and use the glossary and FAQs as reference.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
One-off
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in this issue

1 min.
welcome to raspberry pi for beginners

Since 2012, the Raspberry Pi has revolutionised home computing around the world, providing people with a portable, affordable and incredibly versatile piece of tech to do with as they see fit. Now available in a variety of flavours, from the tiny Pi Zero to the powerful Pi 3 Model B, the mini computer’s popularity shows no signs of slowing. For those looking to try their hand at coding and custom computing for the first time, Raspberry Pi for Beginners will help you select the ideal model for your needs, set up your new device and take your first steps in this exciting new world. Once you have mastered the basics, we even provide plenty of fun projects to sink your teeth into, as well as offering guidance on Python and…

4 min.
what is raspberry pi?

The Raspberry Pi sprang out of a desire by colleagues at the University of Cambridge’s Computer Laboratory to see a return to the days of kids programming inexpensive computers. The rise of expensive PCs and games consoles put paid to the BBC Micro, Spectrum and Commodore 64 generation of home programmers, leading to applicants for computer studies courses lacking the necessary skills. After spending a few years designing prototypes, Eben Upton, formerly of the University but now working as a chip designer for Broadcom, joined forces with his old university colleagues, Pete Lomas of hardware design company Norcott Technologies and David Braben, co-author of classic BBC Micro game Elite, to form the Raspberry Foundation. Three years later, the Raspberry Pi went into mass production with the Model B (main image),…

4 min.
what is linux?

Linux is the operating system (OS) used for your Raspberry Pi. Its role is exactly the same as Windows, OS X on the Mac, Android (in fact, Android is based on the Linux kernel), iOS or any other OS you care to mention. That role is to provide a platform for everything else to run on. It talks to the hardware and it talks to you, the user. But what makes Linux different to any other OS out there? Well, for a start it’s free (more about that later), immensely powerful, highly customisable and the best bit is it’s been created for users by users. However to call Linux ‘an operating system’ is a bit of a misnomer. It’s not ‘one operating system’ in the same way that Windows 10 or OS…

4 min.
choose an operating system

The Raspberry Pi has captured the hearts and imaginations of people since its launch in 2012. There’s rarely a day gone by where we haven’t heard of some wonderful hardware or software project from the ever-growing community of Raspberry Pi enthusiasts. Just looking through the pages of this book will show you what can be done. The potential for the Raspberry Pi’s achievements are limited only by the users’_imagination. However, it’s not just the hardware that’s worthy of consideration. The Raspberry Pi is capable of running a variety of different Linux operating systems. These – known as distributions, or distro for short – are as varied as the many Raspberry Pi projects, and each offers a different look and feel, as well as different functionality. Let’s take a look at some…

1 min.
which distro is best?

Clearly the ripest fruit to begin with is Raspbian, as it provides an ideal environment to learn and experiment in. Raspbian is friendly, easy to use and particularly easy to customise and tweak, once you start to get to grips with the way Linux works. It is widely accepted as the best distro in which to start your Raspberry Pi adventures. A great next step is often Ubuntu MATE, since Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution used on full-size desktop and laptop computers. It’s also easy to use. People with specific goals in mind, such as running a Kodi-based media server, will want to check out OSMC and OpenELEC. Many users will later progress to Arch after spending time learning how Linux is developed and how it works under the hood. It requires…

4 min.
use other operating systems

Although the Raspberry Pi has many operating systems that are compatible and configured for use with its hardware, there are some which the users of the Raspberry Pi have clamoured for since its arrival. Many of these have since been absorbed into NOOBS or linked directly from the official Raspberry Pi website – things like Ubuntu MATE, Fedora, media centre distros like OSMC. There are far more operating systems for your Pi than just these, though. There is a well-maintained list of them over on the eLinux wiki page (elinux.org). Two which have proven particularly problematic are Android, which is the operating system used on smartphones and tablets, and Chromium OS, the development operating system forming the base of Chrome OS, which powers Google Chromebooks. There are examples of each available…