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ReminisceReminisce

Reminisce

December/January 2020

Relax, Laugh and Remember with Reminisce Magazine. Each issue is a "time capsule" of life from the 30's, 40's, 50's and 60's filled with reader-written stories, pictures from the past, embarrassing moments, ads from the Old Days and much more!

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Trusted Media Brands Inc.
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
i’ll be home for christmas

When I was growing up, our Christmas activities weren’t formal enough to be called traditions. With my parents working full time, my brothers’ end-of-term exams and club hockey games, not to mention the frenzy of holiday shopping and decorating, Christmas was more like organized chaos. We had a few holiday habits—decorating the tree as we all sang along to Frank Sinatra’s A Jolly Christmas LP is one I cherish—but we didn’t approach the season with a set schedule. That spontaneity carried its own magic. But the delightful Christmases readers describe in “Home for the Holidays,” beginning on page 30, show the fun in the planned magic of seasonal traditions. Today, my own family has one holiday tradition, dreamed up by my husband, Mark: Every Christmas Eve, we read Charles Dickens’ A Christmas…

1 min.
tell us your story!

MAIN STREET, USA We’d like to highlight Main Streets of the past. Did you have a Main Street in your hometown? What did it look like? What made it fun? And if you lived in a village, town or city called Springfield, we would love to hear from you. Your photos are especially welcome! Label your story and photos “Main Street.” AT THE TABLE We’d love to see your pictures of mealtimes—at home, on the road, in restaurants, at the campsite, on special occasions or just with family. Label your photos “At the Table.” TAKE IT FROM ME Were you a devoted reader of advice columnists like Ann Landers, Dear Abby or Emily Post? Perhaps your local newspaper had a homegrown advice columnist? Or did you dispense wisdom to friends and family? Tell us all…

1 min.
reminisce

EDITORIAL CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Beth Tomkiw ASSOCIATE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Christina Spalatin DEPUTY EDITOR Mary-Liz Shaw EDITOR Natalie Wysong LAYOUT DESIGNER Payton Grote COPY CHIEF Deb Warlaumont Mulvey COPY EDITORS Dulcie Shoener (senior), Amy Rabideau Silvers, Ann Walter; Nancy A. Herrick, Chris McLaughlin (contributing) SENIOR EDITOR, DIGITAL Lori Vanover CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Russ Maki MANAGER, EDITORIAL SERVICES Kelly Madison-Liebe SENIOR RIGHTS ASSOCIATE Jill Godsey EDITORIAL BUSINESS ASSISTANT Megan Smith PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jon Syverson MANAGER, PUBLISHING TECHNOLOGIES Dena Ahlers BUSINESS ANALYST Shannon Stroud JUNIOR BUSINESS ANALYSTS Jill Banks, Grant Beattie BUSINESS SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, SALES Lora Gier EASTERN ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Pete Holfelder Jr. MIDWEST ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kim Krubeck Hinrichs DIRECT RESPONSE ADVERTISING Warren Berger, wberger@mediapeople.com ART DIRECTOR Michael Castellano DIRECTOR, SALES SERVICES Gisele Myer DIRECTOR, MAGAZINE & BOOK PRODUCTION Kim Corrigan PRODUCTION ANALYST Aracely Lopez TRUSTED MEDIA BRANDS, INC. PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Bonnie Kintzer CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER Dean Durbin CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER John Boland CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER C. Alec Casey CHIEF DIGITAL…

2 min.
1965 civil rights, the astrodome and lost in space

More than 30,000 join the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s civil rights march to Montgomery, Alabama. A traffic stop gone wrong leads to riots in Los Angeles’ Watts neighborhood that leave 34 dead and more than 1,000 injured. TV favorites F-Troop, Lost in Space, Green Acres, I Dream of Jeannie and Get Smart all debut in the same week. Helen Gurley Brown starts to turn Cosmopolitan into the single woman’s bible. And sports will never be the same after a University of Florida scientist invents Gatorade. JAN. 2 The New York Jets sign University of Alabama quarterback Joe Namath for a reported $427,000. JAN. 4 President Lyndon B. Johnson unveils his “Great Society” initiative to advance civil rights and aid those in poverty. FEB. 15 Canada raises its new red and white maple…

1 min.
premieres galore

A surge of memorable TV shows debuted in 1965, as the three networks—ABC, CBS and NBC—rushed to satisfy viewers’ insatiable appetite for programming. Which of these played in your living room? 1 Barbara Stanwyck starred as the Barkley family matriarch on this TV Western (pictured). 2 Tom Selleck and Steve Martin each competed on this flirty Chuck Barris-created game show hosted by Jim Lange. 3 Sally Field played beach bunny Frances Lawrence in this sitcom based on a series of teeny-bopper movies. 4 Like Shindig, this show, with its own dancers, served up the day’s grooviest musical acts. 5 Jerry Van Dyke was the lead in this famously terrible sitcom about a guy whose mom was reincarnated as an antique automobile. 6 Players in this game show raced around a grocery store loading their cart with…

1 min.
an electrifying performance

Music fans who headed to Rhode Island’s Newport Folk Festival on July 25, 1965, didn’t expect to witness a major tectonic shift of the musical landscape. But they did. As one of the headliners, Bob Dylan, at 24 already a folk music legend, presented a traditional acoustic set of original, well-known works. He then took a break, and when he returned, he was joined by five other musicians who hauled onstage—horror of horrors!—electrified instruments! Before a slack-jawed crowd, Dylan cast aside both his folk roots and his reputation, plugged in a Fender Stratocaster electric guitar and proceeded to rock out. Hard. He powered through three tunes: “Maggie’s Farm,” a work-in-progress tune called “Phantom Engineer” and what would one day become his signature song, “Like a Rolling Stone.” In doing so, Dylan mixed…