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Adweek

Adweek September 2, 2019

The all-new Adweek features news and information for marketing, media and advertising professionals that you can’t find anywhere else. Each issue includes profiles and interviews with top newsmakers, critiques of hot ad campaigns, the latest trends in print, digital and advertising and much more.

Страна:
United States
Язык:
English
Издатель:
Adweek, LLC
Периодичность:
Weekly
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2 мин.
the chicken sandwich wars

Congratulations and condolences to creative marketers. The good news: You can stop brainstorming about, “What is our Whopper Detour?” The bad news: Now you must answer, “What is our Popeyes chicken sandwich?” The product launch that set a new bar for buzz, Popeyes’ new sandwich exploded onto the scene this month and quickly transcended from menu addition to cultural phenomenon. Thanks to the brand’s social savvy (via agency GSD&M) and being embraced by the massively influential force known collectively as Black Twitter, the launch led to unprecedented lines at every Popeyes location nationwide. Then it happened: The chain sold out. While running out of a test product—as KFC did this past week with its plant-based Beyond Fried Chicken—is a good problem to have, running empty on your hottest, permanent menu item is a…

1 мин.
hashtag challenge

As the U.S. Open ramps up with brand activations, Ralph Lauren is rolling out a new campaign tied to the sporting event on TikTok. Ralph Lauren is using both the sponsored hashtag challenge offered on TikTok and the platform’s latest offering, which lets consumers buy products within the app, called Hashtag Challenge Plus. This marks the first time a luxury brand has rolled out a campaign on the platform—and one that’s specifically tied to a sporting event. The luxury brand’s campaign comes in layers: first, a series of three videos with Booksmart actress Diana Silvers; a call to action with a hashtag campaign dubbed #WinningRL asking users to participate and show off a time they won a real-life challenge; and a shoppable aspect, in which consumers can shop U.S. Open-branded…

1 мин.
brand marketing

The Animal Legal Defense Fund has brought a class-action lawsuit against Oregon dairy company Tillamook, alleging that the firm engaged in deceptive marketing practices by conveying its products as being supplied by small family farms. The complaint, filed in the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon on Aug. 19 on behalf of several residents of the state, contends that Tillamook “misrepresents the nature, source, characteristics, and production practices of its dairy products.” While the company’s traditional home is in the lush environs of the Oregon Coast in Tillamook County (its corporate headquarters are in Portland), it has emerged that a majority of the milk for its products comes from industrial farms in the more arid, eastern part of the state. The complaint contends that the company violates Oregon consumer…

1 мин.
in adweek history october 2005

With its 2018 revenue at $55 billion, Facebook is the 800-pound gorilla of online advertising—but it wasn’t always this way. Fourteen years ago, Adweek (which is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year) stood aghast at the soaring growth of a social network called MySpace. You remember MySpace, don’t you? Well, you should. In 2005, as we reported, the platform signed up a gang of heavy-hitting brands including McDonald’s, P&G, Sony Pictures and Boost Mobile—no small part of why News Corp decided it was worth plunking down $580 million for the site. “For advertising dressed up as in-demand content,” we observed, “MySpace members eagerly interact.” Or, at least, they did interact. MySpace’s reign was a brief one, its audience siphoned off by another platform you might have heard of: Facebook.…

4 мин.
will dtc eat food giants’ lunch?

At Nuggs, a direct-to-consumer brand that creates pea protein-based nuggets, customers are technically eating a prototype. Thanks to the direct line DTC brands have to customer feedback, a company like Nuggs works on new versions of its nuggets, making it an ever-evolving product where the next box of Nuggs is better than the last. Nuggs is part of the growing market of companies challenging CPG in a variety of categories, from the bathroom to the kitchen. Companies like Brightland, a digitally native brand selling California-grown olive oil, and Magic Spoon, a DTC cereal made for adults, are attracting venture capital and an organic following based on how these firms are challenging the CPG world and what they see in the market that others like General Mills and Tyson don’t—or just aren’t adapting…

4 мин.
ai doesn’t want your copywriting job

The art of copywriting is as old as advertising itself, made great by industry legends like David Ogilvy and Bill Bernbach. But as marketers begin turning toward tools that automate copy, is the craft in danger? Over the past few years, brands have been toying with different ways AI can double as a wordsmith. While these experiments have proven that AI’s ability to “learn” mass amounts of information give it a unique advantage when it comes to churning out copy, it’s also become increasingly clear that there’s only so much the technology can provide from a creative perspective. Take Saatchi & Saatchi Los Angeles, which trained IBM Watson to spit out copy for Toyota Mirai ads in 2017 as part of a campaign geared toward tech and science enthusiasts. While Watson was…