Classic Bike

Classic Bike September 2020

Classic Bike helps and inspires enthusiasts to get more from their passion for classic motorcycles. The magazine shares their fascination with motorcycling’s heroic past while also helping them buy, fix and improve the bikes in their shed. Our main areas of content are: - Inspirational and entertaining reads that celebrate the glory of motorcycling, from riding stories that put the reader in the seat of history’s greatest bikes to incredible racing tales - Restoration stories and instructional features that inspire and help people get their tools out and sort out their old bike - In-depth technical features from the most expert and authoritative writers in motorcycling If you share our passion about classic motorcycles from the last century, you'll enjoy reading Classic Bike.

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Страна:
United Kingdom
Язык:
English
Издатель:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
Периодичность:
Monthly
338,04 ₽
2 773,91 ₽
12 Выпуск(ов)

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1 мин.
out to grass

It’s not often that a grasstrack machine commands the top price at a major auction. But the delightful circa 1928 Douglas DT5 that sold for £16,875 at H&H’s sale on July 22 is an exceptional machine. Believed to have been raced by leading Leicester grasstracker Dave Brantom in its heyday, the bike features a Norton clutch conversion and is a lovely example of the highly sought- after Douglas Dirt Track model. Of 61 bikes offered, only 17 remained unsold – proof positive that auction buyers are gaining confidence in the online format. H&H’s next online bike sale is set for September 16 – and they are hoping that their sale scheduled for November 14 at the National Motorcycle Museum will be able to run as a traditional ‘live audience’ sale. handh.co.uk…

2 мин.
my dream machine

This is my 1968 Honda domestic market CB350. I first clapped eyes on the 250 version on a trip to Japan, during a visit to the Honda Collection Hall. The bike looked cool to me – a cross between a CB77 and the CB350 we got here in the States. I was pretty sure that I’d never get to own one, as I’d have to purchase it in Japan and then have it shipped to my home in the USA. That situation remained until December of 2017, when a mate of mine, Bill Silvers, sent out a note of his intent to sell off a pair of bikes. On a whim, I opened the pictures attached to the note – and there it was! The pictures showed a 1968 Honda domestic…

1 мин.
twelve of the best

There may have only been 12 bikes in Bonhams’ July online sale – but all of them sold. And all save a 1958 Innocenti Lambretta restoration project made considerably over their low estimates, with most achieving substantially more than top estimate. Bearing in mind the sale took place just a few weeks ahead of Bonhams’ massive three-day Bicester event on August 14-16, that’s an impressive result. An extensively modified 1948 Vincent-HRD Rapide, requiring substantial recommissioning work, made top price of the day, selling for £36,000 but there were some good buys for the less well-heeled, too. The 1929 Matchless T4 special pictured left was one such. Despite numerous non-standard parts, a useable vintage 350 for £3150 sounds pretty good to us. bonhams.com…

1 мин.
double header

The weekend of October 10/11 is going to be a busy one for Bonhams. Across the pond in Birmingham, Alabama they host their third annual sale in conjunction with the Barber Museum’s Vintage Festival on October 10. Heading the early entries is a superb collection of early BMWs, including a sensational, 1928 R57. Produced for just three years, the R27 is both rare and sought after and this example, which carries an estimate of $50,000-70,000 is simply stunning. And Bonhams’ UK team is gearing up for a return to Stafford for their autumn sale on October 10/11. Of the early consignment, a 1937 Brough Superior 11-50hp is tipped to do well, with an estimate of £50,000-60,000 – but, as befits the host show, which celebrates later classics, there are some fascinating…

2 мин.
four for everyone

If Honda’s CB750 brought four-cylinder motorcycling to the masses, the CB400F brought it to the relatively skint. When it appeared in UK dealers’ showrooms in 1975, having been announced at the Earls Court Show late the previous year, the new four was priced at just £669. Suddenly, anyone who could raise a hundred quid for the deposit (and convince the finance company they weren’t going to do a runner) could hit the road on a four. You’ll have to pay a bit more to own what Bike magazine memorably dubbed ‘the poor boy’s musclebike’ these days, but a CB400F is still a relatively affordable classic. Projects start at around £1000 and you should be able to find a useable, tidy runner for £2500-3000, while a concours example might make £5000-5500. As…

1 мин.
timeline

1958: The ohv, 248cc AJS Model 14 and Matchless G2 are launched 1959: Scrambler CS versions of the 250s introduced 1960: 350cc AJS Model 8 and Matchless G5 join the lightweight range 1961: S (Sports) variants of both models introduced 1962: Last year of production for both 350 models and the standard versions of the 250. CSR versions of both AJS and Matchless 250s introduced. 1963: Improved oil pump and direct oil feed to cam followers. 1964: No major changes. 1965: High-compression pistons and coil valve springs. 1966: Last year of the Model 14 CSR and G2 CSR.…